pinion

(redirected from pinioned)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to pinioned: nescience, enfranchised, garishly, fettered, untrammeled

pinion

(pĭn′yən)
n.
1. The wing of a bird.
2. The outer rear edge of the wing of a bird, containing the primary feathers.
3. A primary feather of a bird.
tr.v. pin·ioned, pin·ioning, pin·ions
1.
a. To remove or bind the wing feathers of (a bird) to prevent flight.
b. To cut or bind (the wings of a bird).
2.
a. To restrain or immobilize (a person) by binding the arms.
b. To bind (a person's arms).
3. To bind fast or hold down; shackle.

pinion

rear section of a bird's wing; holds the flight feathers.
References in classic literature ?
This room also was panelled, and in the middle of the wall on our left, his hands lashed to a ring-bolt high above his head, his toes barely touching the floor, his neck pinioned by a strap passing through smaller ring-bolts under either ear, and every inch of him secured on the same principle, stood, or rather hung, all that was left of Raffles, for at the first glance I believed him dead.
His companion, the tall man in the gamekeeper's clothes, sprang to my right side, and the next moment the two scoundrels held me pinioned between them in the middle of the road.
Not content with this dangerous exposure of her person, she was in the act of tossing her arms in triumph, when the dark figure of Mahtoree shot into the light and pinioned them to her side.
The other prisoners had better usage; two of them were kept pinioned, indeed, because the captain was not able to trust them; but the other two were taken into my service, upon the captain's recommendation, and upon their solemnly engaging to live and die with us; so with them and the three honest men we were seven men, well armed; and I made no doubt we should be able to deal well enough with the ten that were coming, considering that the captain had said there were three or four honest men among them also.
In the course of a few miles, however, I discovered that it had a glazed cap at one end and a pair of muddy shoes at the other and further observation demonstrated it to be a small boy in a snuff-coloured coat, with his arms quite pinioned to his sides, by deep forcing into his pockets.
The master aimed a blow at Oliver's head with the ladle; pinioned him in his arm; and shrieked aloud for the beadle.