pinfeather


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pinfeather

(pĭn′fĕth′ər)
n.
A growing feather still enclosed in its horny sheath, especially one just emerging through the skin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Feathers, pinfeathers and down should all come off at the same time.
Not all birds will be covered in pinfeathers during the first split season, but there's a good chance they will.
By the time the wheat started tuming yellow, they were ready to be "put up." A day was set, and all employees, children and a neighbor or two joined forces to kill, scald, pluck feathers, singe pinfeathers, cut up and place the chicken parts into freezer containers.
Even so, many feathers and pinfeathers remain; Reed says that about 70 workers downstream of evisceration are devoted entirely to removing residual feathers.
Notes accumulate under and around her like brush strokes, like paychecks; like all the pinfeathers required to make one airworthy wing, angel white or hen brown.
The skulls, for example, which play a role in his vanitas paintings, are almost startlingly un-bonelike, and though he captures well the plucked flesh and claw-skin of suspended turkey, the pinfeathers are something of an embarrassment, as though he tried too hard.
Most important, white pinfeathers looked less unappetizing if not completely plucked.(22) To satisfy the broiler processors, in 1953 Charles Vantress successfully converted his red-colored Cornish male into the Vantress Dominant White Male Line.
But at The Nature Conservancy's new Gray Davis Dye Creek Preserve, in the Sacramento Valley near Red Bluff, the worlds of pinstripes and pinfeathers collided with happy results.
I've been plucked so many times I'm right down to the pinfeathers. And, baby, it's cold outside.
If there are lots of pinfeathers in the duck, forget it as a bird for taxidermy because the duck will never look right.
They also have fewer feathers in general which helps to reduce pinfeathers at processing time on these colored birds.
She deftly defines the speaker as a caged bird: her "napehairs rise like pinfeathers"; she stands mute and motionless, like an animal caught in headlights; all she knows is "crow-flight," the instinct needed to go somewhere else, be something else.