pineal

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Related to pineal glands: pituitary glands, Thymus glands, Thyroid glands

pineal

 [pin´e-al]
1. shaped like a pine cone.
2. pertaining to the pineal body.
pineal body a small, conical structure attached by a stalk to the posterior wall of the third ventricle of the cerebrum, believed by many to be an endocrine gland. In certain amphibians and reptiles the gland is thought to function as a light receptor. In most mammals, including humans, it appears to be the major or unique site of melatonin biosynthesis; the effect of melatonin on the body and the exact function of the pineal body remain obscure. Called also epiphysis cerebri and pineal gland.

pin·e·al

(pin'ē-ăl),
1. Shaped like a pine cone. Synonym(s): piniform
2. Pertaining to the pineal body.
[L. pineus, relating to the pine, pinus]

pineal

/pin·e·al/ (pin´e-il)
1. pertaining to the pineal body.
2. shaped like a pine cone.

pineal

(pĭn′ē-əl, pī′nē-)
adj.
1. Having the form of a pine cone.
2. Of or relating to the pineal gland.

pineal

[pin′ē·əl]
Etymology: L, pineus, pine cone
1 pertaining to the pineal body.
2 resembling a pine cone.

pineal

adjective Referring to the pineal gland or region of the brain.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PIE knee ull
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PIN ee tull

pin·e·al

(pin'ē-ăl)
1. Shaped like a pinecone.
Synonym(s): piniform.
2. Pertaining to the pineal body.
[L. pineus, relating to the pine, pinus]

pineal

1. shaped like a pine cone.
2. pertaining to the pineal body.

pineal body, pineal gland
a small, conical endocrine gland attached by a stalk to the dorsal wall of the third ventricle of the cerebrum. In certain amphibians and reptiles the gland functions as a light receptor. In most mammals, including humans, it appears to be the major or unique site of melatonin biosynthesis. The effect of melatonin on the body and the exact function of the pineal body remain uncertain. There is an increasing body of evidence that the pineal body is inhibitory to the gonads and that it is the principal mechanism in the known effect of environmental illumination on estrous cycles. It is proposed that the retina perceives the changes in light intensity and stimulates the pineal gland via the sympathetic nervous system.
pineal extract
pineal eye
in lower vertebrates the pineal body is a third or pineal eye.
pineal gland
see pineal body (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
The concentrations of cAMP in the pineal glands collected from ewes during the SN (72 [+ or -] 9 pg/mg of protein) photoperiod were lower (p<0.
The relationship between the gene encoding melanopsin, Opn4, and the sleep-wake cycle has been examined in mouse models: mice were genetically altered to have no Opn4 or rods and cones had no suppression of melatonin from the pineal gland in the presence of light (Bailes & Lucas, 2010).
The Pineal Gland and Reproduction", Human Reproduction Update, European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology.
In a 2001 study that administered copper daily to Wistar rats for a 6-week period, copper significantly reduced the activity of N-acetyltransferase, an enzyme in their pineal glands needed to produce melatonin from serotonin.
Melatonin, a hormone produced in the pineal gland of the brain, is well known as a sleep aid; it is registered as a drug for that purpose in Europe.
Decreased melatonin biosynthesis, calcium flux, pineal gland calcification and aging: a hypothetical framework.
The pineal gland is a pea-sized structure located in the midline of the brain between the two thalami lying above the third ventricle outside the blood-brain barrier.
The first component of the innervation path of the pineal gland is the retino-hypothalamic tract, which is projected from the retina to the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus between now travels towards the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and in them towards intermediolateral cell column of the layers VII between T1 and T3 levels of the spinal cord through the medial pathway of the anterior brain (Moore, 1996).
The pineal gland was once considered a vestigial organ, comparable to the appendix.
For instance, the pineal gland in the brain and adrenal glands, which are in the chest cavity, both influence how we cope with anxiety.
To investigate this hypothesis, researchers have primarily used two approaches: (1) removing the pineal glands of laboratory animals (e.
RECOGNITION OF N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE (GLYNAC) AND POLY-NACETYLLACTOSAMINE RESIDUES IN VESSELS OF THE RAT PINEAL GLAND