pineal

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Related to pineal glands: pituitary glands, Thymus glands, Thyroid glands

pineal

 [pin´e-al]
1. shaped like a pine cone.
2. pertaining to the pineal body.
pineal body a small, conical structure attached by a stalk to the posterior wall of the third ventricle of the cerebrum, believed by many to be an endocrine gland. In certain amphibians and reptiles the gland is thought to function as a light receptor. In most mammals, including humans, it appears to be the major or unique site of melatonin biosynthesis; the effect of melatonin on the body and the exact function of the pineal body remain obscure. Called also epiphysis cerebri and pineal gland.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pin·e·al

(pin'ē-ăl),
1. Shaped like a pine cone. Synonym(s): piniform
2. Pertaining to the pineal body.
[L. pineus, relating to the pine, pinus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pineal

(pĭn′ē-əl, pī′nē-)
adj.
1. Having the form of a pine cone.
2. Of or relating to the pineal gland.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pineal

adjective Referring to the pineal gland or region of the brain.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PIE knee ull
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PIN ee tull
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

pin·e·al

(pin'ē-ăl)
1. Shaped like a pinecone.
Synonym(s): piniform.
2. Pertaining to the pineal body.
[L. pineus, relating to the pine, pinus]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
But it must be remembered that the pineal gland does not control circadian rhythms in isolation.
One factor that has been proposed to play a role in regulating circadian alcohol consumption pattern is the hormone melatonin, which is produced by the pineal gland. Research also indicates that the effects of lighting conditions on the alcohol consumption of animal models may be influenced by the differences among the strains of the laboratory animals used, variations in the type and administration schedule of the animals' alcohol-containing diet, disruptions of the normal circadian rhythm, concurrent use of other drugs, and properties of the light.
Muhlbauer, "Increased melatonin synthesis in pineal glands of rats in streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetes," Journal of Pineal Research, vol.
The first component of the innervation path of the pineal gland is the retino-hypothalamic tract, which is projected from the retina to the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus between now travels towards the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and in them towards intermediolateral cell column of the layers VII between T1 and T3 levels of the spinal cord through the medial pathway of the anterior brain (Moore, 1996).
In the pineal gland the biotinylated LEL was used to investigate the appearance of these sugar residues in the structures of the rats during their development and adult life.
In some mammals, as well as other animals, S-antigen, rhodopsin kinase and retinoid-binding protein have been located in pineal glands. In one experiment, S-antigen caused an inflammation of the pineal gland similar to the sometimes blinding disease of the retina known as uveitis.
They then performed MRI brain scans to measure the volume of the pineal gland. They found that coffeelovers had pineal glands 20 per cent smaller than non-drinkers and experienced more problems sleeping.
Pigments have been described in the pineal gland of different mammals such as bovines [11, 12], chinchilla [13], horse [14], bat [15, 16], dog [17], cat [18], sheep [19, 20], and humans [21-23].
The concentrations of 5-HIAA in the pineal glands of the control ewes were lower (p<0.05) during the SN (80 [+ or -] 11 pg/mg of tissue) photoperiod than during the LN (201 [+ or -] 36 pg/mg of tissue) photoperiod.
This rhythm is regulated by the pineal gland, a neuro-endocrine organ located at the base of the brain.
Western blot analysis was carried out to determine MT1 and AANAT protein expression levels in the gonads and pineal glands, respectively, of puppies using the ECL Western blotting analysis system (Amersham Life Science Inc., Arlington Heights, IL).
The centre of brain consists of a pinecone shaped structure called pineal body or pineal gland. It is a sensitive biological watchdog in brain.