pine oil


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pine oil

the volatile oil from the wood of Pinus palustris and other species of Pinus; used as a deodorant and disinfectant.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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--Acquisition of Georgia-Pacific's pine oil chemicals occurs in the beginning of 2018 upon disclosed terms financed by new notes.
Keywords: Diabetes, Pine oil, MDA, Glutathione, Cholesterol, Brain
The LC50 values of Pine oil extract after 24 and 48 hours were 0.25 and, 0.06 ml respectively, while LC99 values at 24 and 48 hour were and 0.89 ml and 0.64 ml respectively.
"The guards poured pine solvent on the floor and used Khadr as a human mop, dragging him on his stomach back and forth through the mixture of urine and pine oil," according to the brief.
For the pine oil: Boil pine branches in water until soft Drain.
That is why the pine oil smell of antiseptic products such as Dettol makes most housewives buy the product because they relate the smell to a clean, sterilized clinic or hospital.In terms of touch - we sometimes feel that clothing stores only display new products in their shops to show off the new designs but mostly they also display products to ensure that we sample the products in our hands.
More important for the liquid biofuel sector--and of potential significant importance for heavily forested and cold climate countries such as Finland is the development of pine oil production and its use as a biodiesel feedstock.
The bodies of three members of the family, born between 1765 and 1800, were preserved naturally because of the cold, dry air of the crypt and the pine oil used to make their coffins.
Unlike the sophisticated devices conjured by Iraqi bombmakers with access to a large supply of ammunition, IEDs in Afghanistan are rudimentary--often just a yellow pine oil jug or pressure cooker packed with fertiliser or a homemade device crafted out of wood and batteries, stuck into a culvert in the road.
Along with warnings like "Chemical disinfectants only temporarily clean with long term, hazardous effects to you and the environment," the most common chemical used to kill bacteria are phenol (a particularly hazardous class of chemicals), quaternary ammonia, pine oil, and sodium hypochlorite, otherwise known as chlorine bleach.
Dropping rosemary, cedar, spruce, fir, thyme or pine oil into water, boiling it and inhaling the steam can provide relief as well.
The trees continue to be a source for turpentine, resin and pine oil, which is used in cosmetics and perfume.