pilot


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PILOT

[pī′lət]
a computer interpreter language, similar to BASIC, used in computer-assisted instruction.

pilot

noun A study that is shorter in duration with a smaller cohort, which is used to test a theory, design, process or product, before committing resources to a full fledged study. Also called feasibility study, pilot experiment, pilot study, “quick and dirty study”.
 
verb To try or test drive a thing or process, as in to pilot GP commissioning.
References in classic literature ?
The pilot probably does not know to this day why his responses won him this enthusiastic greeting.
You saved yourself," he insisted, "for had you been unable to pilot the plane, I could not have helped you, and now," he said, "you two have the means of returning to the settlements.
Below, to star-board, on the bridge deck, the pilot saw the crushed mess-room door, roughly bulkheaded against the pounding seas.
It must 'a' been a big un," the pilot remarked sympathetically.
As for the Portuguese pilot, he being desirous to see the court, we bore his charges for his company, and for our use of him as an interpreter, for he understood the language of the country, and spoke good French and a little English.
Having resolved upon this, we agreed that if our Portuguese pilot would go with us, we would bear his charges to Moscow, or to England, if he pleased; nor, indeed, were we to be esteemed over- generous in that either, if we had not rewarded him further, the service he had done us being really worth more than that; for he had not only been a pilot to us at sea, but he had been like a broker for us on shore; and his procuring for us a Japan merchant was some hundreds of pounds in our pockets.
Dantes continued at his post in spite of the presence of the pilot, until this manoeuvre was completed, and then he added, "Half-mast the colors, and square the yards
I gave the custom-house officers a copy of our bill of lading; and as to the other papers, they sent a man off with the pilot, to whom I gave them.
The little school world of Wareham palpitates with excitement when it sees the senior and the junior editors of The Pilot walking together
So saying, the pilot began to weep afresh, and the crew, fearing their last hour had come, made their wills, each one in favour of his fellow.
At noon next day, as the pilot had foretold, we were so near to the Black Mountain that we saw all the nails and iron fly out of the ships and dash themselves against the mountain with a horrible noise.
Some of our sailors, whether out of treachery or inadvertence, had informed the pilots "that I was a stranger, and great traveller;" whereof these gave notice to a custom-house officer, by whom I was examined very strictly upon my landing.