pilocytic astrocytoma


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Related to pilocytic astrocytoma: medulloblastoma

pilocytic as·tro·cy·to·ma

a slowly growing astrocytoma composed histologically of elongated astrocytes; often located in the optic chiasm region of the third ventricle, hypothalamus, or cerebellum, predominantly in younger people.
Synonym(s): piloid astrocytoma

pi·lo·cyt·ic as·tro·cy·to·ma

(pī'lō-sit'ik as'trō-sī-tō'mă)
A slowly growing astrocytoma composed histologically of elongated astrocytes; often located in the optic chiasm region of the third ventricle, hypothalamus, or cerebellum, predominantly in younger individuals.

pilocytic astrocytoma

A low-grade (relatively slow growing) tumor made of supporting cells of the brain. It usually found in the cerebellum of children, in whom it causes symptoms of headache, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty with balance.
See also: astrocytoma
References in periodicals archive ?
Cases of pilocytic astrocytoma showed the least agreement with a sensitivity of 33.
Pilocytic astrocytomas are relatively well circumscribed; however, the higher-grade astrocytomas demonstrate poorly defined margins (Figure 4).
NF1 is among the most common tumor predisposition syndromes, but it accounts for only about 15 percent of pediatric low-grade gliomas known as pilocytic astrocytomas.
10) Studies showed that the highest PCNA and Ki-67 LI values were detected in glioblastoma (GBM) while pilocytic astrocytoma showed the lowest values.
In the 1 to 4 years old age group, pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I) (43%), medulloblastoma (13%), and craniopharyngioma (10%) dominated.
Pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO grade I) is a slow-growing cystic tumor occurring most often in young adulthood, with only a small portion (10%) located in the cerebral hemispheres (Jemal et al.
9 9 Astrocytoma (Grade II) 4 3 Pilocytic Astrocytoma 4 21 Glioblastoma 4.
Family and friends of the Eaglescliffe youngster were devastated last year when they were told she had pilocytic astrocytoma - an inoperable brain tumour.
Pathology revealed that the tumor was a juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (WHO Grade 1).
Once consultants confirmed there was a tumour, Jack was referred to Birmingham Children's Hospital where specialists diagnosed a juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma.
was diagnosed with pilocytic astrocytoma, a childhood brain tumor in June 2011.