pilocarpine


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pilocarpine

 [pi″lo-kahr´pin]
a cholinergic alkaloid from leaves of Pilocarpus jaborandi and P. microphyllus; used topically in the eye as the base or the hydrochloride or nitrate salt as an antiglaucoma agent and miotic; the hydrochloride salt is also used orally to treat mouth dryness resulting from radiotherapy or associated with Sjögren's syndrome. The nitrate salt has also been administered by iontophoresis to produce sweating in a test for cystic fibrosis.

pi·lo·car·pine

(pī'lō-kar'pēn),
An alkaloid obtained from the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus or P. jaborandi (family Rutaceae), shrubs of the West Indies and tropical America; a parasympathomimetic agent used experimentally to induce seizures externally as a miotic and in the treatment of glaucoma; used as the hydrochloride and the nitrate salts.
[G. pilos, a felt hat, + karpos, fruit]

pilocarpine

/pi·lo·car·pine/ (pi″lo-kahr´pēn) a cholinergic alkaloid, used as the base or the hydrochloride or nitrate salt as an antiglaucoma agent and miotic and as the hydrochloride salt in the treatment of xerostomia associated with radiotherapy or Sjögren's syndrome.

pilocarpine

(pī′lō-kär′pēn′)
n.
A colorless or yellow poisonous compound, C11H16N2O2, obtained from the leaves of the jaborandi and used to induce sweating, promote salivation, and treat glaucoma.

pilocarpine

Therapeutics An alkaloid with mild β-adrenergic activity which, topically, ↓ intraocular pressure in glaucoma; it stimulates glands, resulting in diaphoresis, salivation, lacrimation it may be used to treat post-radiation or opioid-induced xerostomia, gastric and pancreatic secretion

pi·lo·car·pine

(pī'lō-kahr'pēn)
An alkaloid obtained from the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus or P. jaborandi, shrubs of the West Indies and tropical Americas; a parasympathomimetic agent used experimentally to induce seizures externally as a miotic and in the treatment of glaucoma.
[G. pilos, a felt hat, + karpos, fruit]

pilocarpine

A drug used in the form of eye-drops to treat GLAUCOMA. Pilocarpine causes extreme constriction of the pupils so that traction is exerted on the root of the iris so as to open up the drainage channels for aqueous humour. The drug is on the WHO official list. Brand names are Minims pilocarpine, Pilogel, Salagen, Sno Pilo, and, in the form of a sustained-release insert placed behind an eyelid and left for a week at a time, Ocusert Pilo.

pilocarpine 

An alkaloid obtained from the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus and other species of Pilocarpus. It is a parasympathomimetic (direct-acting cholinergic) drug, which mimics the effect of acetylcholine causing miosis and accommodation. It counteracts sympathomimetic mydriatics. It is used in the treatment of glaucoma. Pilocarpine hydrochloride is most commonly applied to the eye as a 1% solution. Carbachol and bethanechol chloride are other parasympathomimetic drugs with similar effects to pilocarpine. See parasympathomimetic drug; physostigmine.

pi·lo·car·pine

(pī'lō-kahr'pēn)
An alkaloid used experimentally to induce seizures externally as a miotic and to treat glaucoma.
[G. pilos, a felt hat, + karpos, fruit]

pilocarpine

a cholinergic alkaloid from leaves of Pilocarpus jaborandi and P. microphyllus; used as an ophthalmic miotic in the form of its hydrochloride and nitrate salts.
References in periodicals archive ?
A test for concentration of electrolytes in sweat in cystic fibrosis of the pancreas utilizing pilocarpine by iontophoresis.
Denervation hypersensitivity to dilute pilocarpine as a result of damage to the pupillary parasympathetic supply is known to occur in diabetic patients before the sympathetic pathway is affected.
Four doses of the whole extract (30, 60, 90, and 150 mg/kg) were tested in the pilocarpine model.
It should be noted that, except for cyclosporin and pilocarpine, the substances discussed here are still in the experimental phase, with these agents not being currently available and their cost-benefit relationship being unknown.
Peripheral sweat rate was determined using pilocarpine iontophoresis on the flexor surface of both arms and the two values were averaged.
Several options have been explored, including the use of substances that inhibit catecholamine uptake and metabolism [37] and the use of cholinergic preparations such as pilocarpine.
The effects of a topical [Beta]-antagonist on IOP are synergistic with pilocarpine, and the two drugs are often prescribed together.
A new study, conducted by the National Institute of Dental Research and published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, shows that a drug called pilocarpine hydrochloride was safe and effective in relieving dry mouth in a group of 31 people with Sjogren's syndrome and other diseases that affect salivary-gland function.
The impetus for the study was an anecdotal report a few years ago of marked clinical improvement in cyclophosphamide-induced vaginal dryness in four patients, along with a separate earlier report of significantly decreased vaginal dryness as a secondary outcome measure in a phase III trial of pilocarpine for oral and ocular dryness in patients with Sjogren's syndrome (Arch.
Dry mouth can be relieved by drinking water, sugar-free chewing gum, using artificial saliva or using saliva stimulants (such as pilocarpine and cevimeline).