pictograph

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Related to pictographic: ideographic

pic·to·graph

(pik'tō-graf),
A vision test chart for illiterates.

pictograph

(pĭk′tō-grăf)
A set of test pictures used for testing vision in children and illiterate adults.
References in periodicals archive ?
3] The late Norman Feder, formerly consultant to American Indian Art magazine, published a report on Plains pictographic painting and quilled rosettes in which he concludes that the John Mix Stanley shirt, the robe now in the Linden Museum, and a shirt in the U.
It is recorded that the AAC was moved from this department to the Speech-Language Therapy, and the linguistic environment of the whole association got permeated by the AAC as well as the Bliss System of Communication, the first system of pictographic symbols adopted in Brazil [15].
The lexicographic entry contains a number of pictographic representations of different house styles.
Pictograph to alphabet--and back; reconstructing the pictographic origins of the Xajil Chronicle.
Data were collected from participatory Workshops, informal interviews and pictographic questionnaire.
Policy Manager Action Aid Uzma Tahir said through this pictographic representation of women's struggle to their basic rights and achievements, we would like to highlight that the women across the globe and especially in Pakistan carry invisible extra burdens of being women.
In a study which tried to increase the accuracy rates of dosing information, it was shown that use of pictographic dose recommendation in addition to a written informing about use of antipyretics could prevent misdosing to a large extent, but not completely.
It's tempting to look for pictographic connotations in Fei's twigs.
In chapter 4, "Inscription as Performance: Henri Michaux and the Writing Body," Noland reads the influence of "prehistoric visual culture" (139) on Michaux's work, whose "gestural signs" she explores in the context of the history of his turn from writing to the repetitive gestural pictographic "signing" of his 1951 Mouvements, in order to conclude that "subjectivity is kinetically as well as discursively conditioned"; a condition that, as in the previous chapters, is yet another opportunity for the self to resist and subvert its social inscription.
Plains Indian pictographic paintings of war deeds comprise one of the great bodies of North American indigenous art.