pictograph


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pic·to·graph

(pik'tō-graf),
A vision test chart for illiterates.

pictograph

(pĭk′tō-grăf)
A set of test pictures used for testing vision in children and illiterate adults.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Tennessee River Valley, only pictograph sites are located close to the river itself.
Next, the students chose three or more of their favorite pictographs from the photocopy and drew these on the front of the flap of the pouch.
These texts with a highly visual component tend to be seen by the nonindigenous tutors as pictographs or a primitive stage of alphabetic literacy; primitive because, as the Eurocentric theories of writing go (Elkins), pictographs are supposedly merely mnemonic; seen as mere aide-memoires, pictographs supposedly require completion by oral explanation, are dependent on previous knowledge and are therefore incomplete, context-bound and lack independence; in contrast, alphabetic texts are self contained, context-free and independent.
Gottlieb's first wholly original works--the Pictographs of the 1940s--were born of a creative fusion of Cubist ideas about form with Surrealist ideas about meaning, spiced by his admiration for the forms and emotional kick of tribal art and textiles.
Sixteen pictographs were clear enough to the naked eye to make out their motif forms.
or pictographs, would be faded away by the sun or erased by the blasts of the water.
Pictograph to alphabet--and back; reconstructing the pictographic origins of the Xajil Chronicle.
Of note are several Sioux pieces by Edith Claymore, a fantastic bead worker known for her remarkable pictograph suitcases, satchels and everything possible bags.
With its pictograph characters, Chinese is a vastly different written language from those of European derivation such as English.
His sense of style is clean and open, and he adds just a pinch of whimsy, allowing a Chinese pictograph, for example, to morph into a cartoonish face in an otherwise staid composition.
A similar provision in the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code did not stop a tribunal in that province from ordering another Evangelical Protestant--Hugh Owens--to pay $4,500 in damages to three gay men who were offended by an advertisement he took out in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix that contained a pictograph of two men holding hands superimposed with a circle and slash--the symbol of something forbidden--as well as a list of Bible verses condemning the practice of homosexuality.