picric acid


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pic·ric ac·id

(pik'rik as'id),
Agent used as an application in burns, eczema, erysipelas, and pruritus; potentially explosive in its crystallized form.
[G. pikros, bitter]

picric acid

(pĭk′rĭk)
n.
A poisonous, explosive yellow crystalline solid, C6H3N3O7, used in explosives, dyes, and for etching copper.

picric acid

2,4,6 Trinitrophenol Occupational medicine A strong–pK 1.0 acid once used as a dye, an antiseptic, and fixative; when dry, it is explosive, and used in manufacturing explosives and rocket fuels; occupational exposure results in a yellowish skin

pic·ric ac·id

(pik'rik as'id)
Agent used as an application in burns, eczema, erysipelas, and pruritus.
[G. pikros, bitter]

pic·ric ac·id

(pik'rik as'id)
Agent used as an application in burns, eczema, erysipelas, and pruritus.
[G. pikros, bitter]
References in periodicals archive ?
Dhir, and V Krishnan, "Conformation induced discrimination between picric acid and nitro derivatives/anions with a Cu-pyrene array: the first decision making photonic device," RSC Advances, vol.
A 15 ppm solution of picric acid (0.15 mg) was freshly prepared in 100 mL deionized water and used as standard solution.
Initially, crude carbolic acid, (Lister's first agent), and then a whole variety of chemicals, which included picric acid, iodine, bichloride of mercury, permanganate of potash and corrosive sublimate.
The yellow tag according to Vicar Powell's version was made of white rabbit fur dyed in picric acid. Although I spent countless hours in Dai's little parlour where he dressed his flies on the windowsill, I cannot recall him ever using picric acid.
One of the earliest was a precautionary measure issued by the Health Department of Wyoming (MI), which encouraged workers at the Picric Acid Plant to wash their hands and cover their mouths when coughing.
Kinetics and mechanism of formation of the mono-creatinine picric acid complex.
The growth cycle and generation time of the isolates were recorded as per the method of Pal(5) Production of HCN was assayed by modified method of Castric (7) using picric acid indicator papers.
The vessel was laden with TNT, picric acid, gun-cotton (an explosive substance) and drums of benzol fuel.
The dye is picric acid which is not harmful and will disappear next spring as the birds naturally shed their feathers.
The whey was characterized by titrable acidity, pH, conductimetry, proteins by the Kjedahl method, fats by the Gerber method, lactose by picric acid fotometry and sodium and potassium by atomic absorption.
Creatinine was measured colorimetrically by using picric acid in an alkaline environment (11).
Adding to the excruciating pain suffered from the burn and the secondary physiological sequelae, patients were also subjected to wound dressings soaked in carbolic acid or picric acid. Other clinicians favored paraffin (wax) paper to cover the wounds (Kindleberger, 1907).