phytophotodermatitis

phytophotodermatitis

 [fi″to-fo″to-der″mah-ti´tis]
phototoxic dermatitis due to contact with certain plants and subsequent exposure to sunlight.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phy·to·pho·to·der·ma·ti·tis

(fī'tō-fō'tō-der'mă-tī'tis),
Phytodermatitis resulting from photosensitization.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phytophotodermatitis

A phototoxic skin rash due to physical contact with UV-light-sensitising substances—e.g., from various plant families: Umbelliferae, Rutaceae, Moraceae and Leguminosae; may be found in parsnips citrus fruits and others.

Clinical findings
Blistering, burning, patchy hyperpigmentation (which may simulate marks of child abuse).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

phy·to·pho·to·der·ma·ti·tis

(fī'tō-fō'tō-dĕr'mă-tī'tis)
Phytodermatitis resulting from photosensitization.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
River steward Simon Hirst said the sap induces a strong reaction on the human skin known as phytophotodermatitis. He said it can result in the skin remaining sensitive to the sun for several years.
The lime juice reacted with sunlight on his skin causing Phytophotodermatitis, a condition that some call "margarita photodermatitis"--burning, itching and severe redness that required a trip to the dermatologist's office and a steroid cream prescription.
The blisters heal very slowly and can develop into phytophotodermatitis, a type of skin rash which flares up in sunlight.
It's not recommended that you put lime juice directly on your skin since sun exposure after application can result in phytophotodermatitis, or a painful lime burn.
Some of the common causes of hyperpigmentation include inflammation, skin injury, phytophotodermatitis (photo toxicity), lentigines, melisma, melanoma or even it can be a drug-induced condition.
"Skin reactions vary, but phytophotodermatitis can occur, meaning the sap makes the skin so sensitive to sunlight that severe burns can occur from normal exposure to sun," the post said.
When these come into contact with the skin, and the skin comes into contact with UV light, these chemicals lead to a condition called phytophotodermatitis - a red rash, often followed by severe burns and blistering within 24 hours.
The blisters can also develop into phytophotodermatitis, a type of skin rash caused as a result of sensitivity to chemicals in certain plants and fruit which flares up in sunlight.
The differential diagnosis includes other parasites (uncinariasis, gnathostomiasis, strongyloidiasis, myiasis), dermatophytosis, phytophotodermatitis, erythema chronicum migrans, granuloma annulare, and bullous impetigo.
Physic hyperpigmentations: due to cumulative effect, solar radiation exposure causes senile lentigo, actinic keratosis or photosensitivity caused by perfumes and cosmetic compounds (Riehl's melanosis, poikiloderma of Civatte) or furocoumarins from certain plants (phytophotodermatitis).
A phototoxic reaction with erythema, pruritus, phytophotodermatitis, and friction blisters could occur.