phytophotodermatitis

phytophotodermatitis

 [fi″to-fo″to-der″mah-ti´tis]
phototoxic dermatitis due to contact with certain plants and subsequent exposure to sunlight.

phy·to·pho·to·der·ma·ti·tis

(fī'tō-fō'tō-der'mă-tī'tis),
Phytodermatitis resulting from photosensitization.

phytophotodermatitis

/phy·to·pho·to·der·ma·ti·tis/ (-fo″to-der″mah-ti´tis) phototoxic dermatitis induced by exposure to certain plants and then to sunlight.

phytophotodermatitis

A phototoxic skin rash due to physical contact with UV-light-sensitising substances—e.g., from various plant families: Umbelliferae, Rutaceae, Moraceae and Leguminosae; may be found in parsnips citrus fruits and others.

Clinical findings
Blistering, burning, patchy hyperpigmentation (which may simulate marks of child abuse).

phy·to·pho·to·der·ma·ti·tis

(fī'tō-fō'tō-dĕr'mă-tī'tis)
Phytodermatitis resulting from photosensitization.

phytophotodermatitis

photodermatitis affecting feet or wrists of gardeners, induced by initial skin exposure to the sap of certain plants, and subsequent exposure of the affected skin site to sunlight

phytophotodermatitis

phototoxic dermatitis due to contact with certain plants and subsequent exposure to sunlight.
References in periodicals archive ?
He had developed phytophotodermatitis - a disorder which makes skin hypersensitive to ultraviolet light and can last for years.
The giant hogweed's sap is "clear and watery," but possesses toxins that can cause phytophotodermatitis, a condition that causes the skin to react to ultraviolet rays.
Skin lesions heal after 10-12 days, with transient post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation; they may be confused with allergic or irritant-contact dermatitis, thermal burns, herpes zoster, dermatitis artefacta, herpes simplex, bullous impetigo and phytophotodermatitis.
Iatrogenic phytophotodermatitis resulting from herbal treatment of an allergic contact dermatitis.
The sap of the Giant Hogweed can cause phytophotodermatitis (PPD), which isn't easy to say and even more painful to experience.
The clinical name for the condition is phytophotodermatitis (PPD), sometimes called phototoxic dermatitis [see inset photo on previous page].
To the Editor: Phytophotodermatitis is a cutaneous phototoxic inflammatory eruption due to exposure to light-sensitizing botanical substances and longwave ultraviolet radiation that usually begins approximately 24 hours after exposure and peaks at 48 to 72 hours.
The complaint, called phytophotodermatitis, is caused by a combination of strong sunshine, naturally-occurring chemicals in some plants - and the fashion for wearing shorts.
Phytophotodermatitis is an ultraviolet-induced contact dermatitis due primarily to plant- (= phyto), fruit-, or vegetable-derived photosensitizing compounds such as furocoumarins (psoralens).
You don't have to engage in prurient games to fall victim to phytophotodermatitis.
In fact they were suffering from a condition called phytophotodermatitis, a type of skin complaint triggered by plant chemicals and sunlight.
However, as it was during the really hot weather, it then becomes phytophotodermatitis - a skin irritant that is exacerbated by sunlight.