phytochemical


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Related to phytochemical: Zoochemical

phytochemical

(fī′tō-kĕm′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to phytochemistry.
2. Of or relating to phytochemicals.
n.
A nonnutritive bioactive plant substance, such as a flavonoid or carotenoid, considered to have a beneficial effect on human health. Also called phytonutrient.

phy′to·chem′i·cal·ly adv.

phytochemical

A chemical of plant origin, such as sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables, alicin from garlic and onions, limonene from citrus fruits, isoflavones from beans, and ellagic acid from grapes. Phytochemicals may be useful for certain diseases (e.g., in chemoprevention of malignancy), immune stimulation, etc.

phy·to·chem·i·cal

(fī'tō-kem'i-kăl)
A biologically active but nonnutrient substance found in plants; includes antioxidants and phytosterols.
Synonym(s): bioactive nonnutrient, phytoprotectant.

phytochemical

a compound found in plants or plant-derived products.

Phyto-, as in phytochemical, phytomedicinal, and phytotherapy

Meaning, or pertaining to, a plant or plants.
Mentioned in: Herbalism, Western
References in periodicals archive ?
Pigmented or darker-colored cereal grains, such as red and purple, have higher amounts of some phytochemical compounds than nonpigmented varieties.
The CHNR pilot projects focused on how micronutrients, biofactors and phytochemicals can help reduce the risk of chronic diseases.
Also, if the therapeutic concentration of the oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD) could be reduced by replacing it with a phytochemicals, the side effects caused by the OHD could be reduced to a large extent (Prabhakar and Doble 2009).
New information on phytochemical consumption and oral health is constantly evolving, and research is ongoing to investigate the anti-cancer properties of phytochemicals.
"The phytochemicals found in plant foods, including fruit juices, provide a multitude of benefits to the body," says Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, assistant director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition.
Anthocyanins, the phytochemical compounds responsible for the wild blueberry's blue color, are powerful allies in the fight against aging, dementia, heart disease, and cancer, adds Davis, who recommends that retailers remind consumers to boost their phytochemical intake by tossing a handful of wild blueberries into cereal, yogurt, or a fruit smoothie.
Although phytochemicals are not considered nutrients, substances necessary for sustaining life, they have been identified as containing properties for aiding in disease prevention, says an Ohio State University Extension fact sheet.
Phytochemical functional foods is recommended as a good reference book for R & D departments of food companies.
They are rich in a phytochemical called quercetin (especially red onions) which is a strong antioxidant.
The editors also expand discussion presented in their previous books on phytochemicals. They explore new research on phytochemicals in the Vaccinium family (cranberries, blueberries and bilberries), wine, and oilseeds, and the biological activity of Echinacea in humans.
"Spinach, like carrots, contains beta carotene, another type of phytochemical, which protects the immune system and is useful in warding off heart disease and certain cancers.