phytate


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Related to phytate: Phytase, sodium phytate

phy·tate

(fī'tāt),
A salt or ester of phytic acid.

phytate

(fī′tāt′)
n.
A salt or ester of phytic acid.

phy·tate

(fī'tāt)
A phosphorus-containing compound that binds with minerals in the gastrointestinal tract and decreases their bioavailability.

phytate

inositolhexaphosphoric acid; a source of phosphorus for ruminants and horses but indigestible to carnivores. Present in large amounts in plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
One FTU is defined as the amount of enzyme that generates 1 [micro]-mole of inorganic phosphorus per min from an excess of sodium phytate at pH 5.
Such new formulations will not only reduce fish production costs but will also help to solve aquatic pollution problems by reducing the liberation of phytate phosphorus rich excreta.
Higher serum Zn and P, due to supplemental phytase indicated higher phytate hydrolysis and more available Zn and P for the chickens.
8 In this sense phytate acts as a prebiotic, decreasing bowel transit time, contributing to the lower pH which improves mineral uptake, particularly of calcium.
A slight modification on PSM was that sodium phytate was omitted since its presence did not effect growth of the bacteria (data not shown).
Phytase [myo-inositol (1,2,3,4,5,6) hexakisphosphate], a phytate-specific phosphatase, is already used as a supplement in diets monogastric animals to improve phosphate utilization This class of enzyme has also been found increasingly interesting for use in processing and manufacturing of food for human consumption ,particularly because the decline in food phytate result in enhancement of mineral bioavailability.
Dietary phytate correlated positively with dietary calcium in the urban subjects (r = 0.
Distribution of phytate and nutritionally important elements among the morphological components of cereal grains.
1-5) Phytate from unrefined cereals, and polyphenols from plant sources such as tea or herbs, (7) form insoluble complexes with iron in the intestine and prevent its absorption.
Abstract: Iron absorption was compared in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) fed diets containing high iron (1585 ppm), high iron (1720 ppm) with a phytate (inosital) and tannic acid, low iron (32-34 ppm), low iron with a meat-based dog food, or low iron with vitamin C.