physostigmine


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physostigmine

 [fi″zo-stig´mēn]
a cholinergic alkaloid having anticholinesterase activity, obtained from the dried ripe seed (Calabar bean) of Physostigma venenosum; used topically to produce miosis and to decrease intraocular pressure in glaucoma. It may also be applied parenterally to reverse the central nervous system effects produced by overdosage of anticholinergic drugs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phy·so·stig·mine

(fī'sō-stig'mēn),
An alkaloid of physostigma; it is a reversible inhibitor of the cholinesterases and prevents destruction of acetylcholine; used as a cholinergic agent, and experimentally to enhance the action of acetylcholine at any of its sites of liberation.
Synonym(s): eserine
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

physostigmine

(fī′sō-stĭg′mēn′) also

physostigmin

(-mĭn)
n.
A crystalline alkaloid, C15H21N3O2, extracted from the Calabar bean, used in the form of its sulfate as a miotic and in the form of its salicylate as a cholinergic agent. Also called eserine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

physostigmine

A reversible antiacetylcholinesterase, used in Pts with Sx of an anticholinergic crisis Neurology Memory drug Physostigmine may improve working memory by ↑ efficiency and ↓ effort. See Working memory.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

phy·so·stig·mine

(fī'sō-stig'mēn)
A nonpolar carbamate antidote to anticholinergic compounds.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

physostigmine

A CHOLINESTERASE inhibitor drug used to constrict the pupil of the eye and lower the pressure within the eye in GLAUCOMA. It is also used to treat poisoning with ANTICHOLINERGIC drugs. It is derived form the Calabar bean Physostigma venenosum . Also known as eserine.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

physostigmine 

A reversible anticholinesterase drug used as a parasympathomimetic which, when used in the eye constricts the pupil. It may be used in solution of 0.25-1% or ointment 0.25-0.50% in the treatment of glaucoma, but because of its side-effects its usage is rare nowadays. It is sometimes combined with pilocarpine. Syn. eserine. See miotics; neostigmine; parasympathomimetic drug.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

phy·so·stig·mine

(fī'sō-stig'mēn)
Alkaloid used as a cholinergic agent, and experimentally to enhance action of acetylcholine at any of its sites of liberation.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Presently, several referenced natural acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are known, including physostigmine, galantamine, and huperzine A.
Use of physostigmine for hallucinogenic plant poisoning in a teenager: case report and review of the literature.
Sedation with benzodiazepines is often indicated later; and physostigmine, 1-2 mg intravenously and repeated as indicated every 30-60 minutes (to a maximum total dose of 5-6 mg), can reverse a central anti-cholinergic syndrome in severe cases with coma and tachydysrhythmias.
Physostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, was not used because of the self-limiting course.
This compound is considered to be more effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to have fewer limitations than physostigmine and tacrine (Gordon et al., 2000).
However, slowly administered intravenous physostigmine in 1 and 2 mg doses in an adult2 at 1- to 2-hour intervals and 0.5 mg doses in a child3 at 5- to 10-minute intervals up to a maximum of 2 mg/hour have been reported to be effective in the control of central nervous system toxicity caused by Amantadine hydrochloride.
The Mestinon is a compound similar to physostigmine or neostigmine, which keeps what little acetylcholine there is in the synapse for as long as possible before it degrades.
Both scopolamine and physostigmine induced blood flow changes in limbic brain regions, but the flow pattems were different in cocaine addicts and healthy subjects.
The substances - scopolamine and physostigmine - act on acetylcholine receptors.
Effects of scopolamine, physostigmine and chlordiazepoxide on punished and extinguished water consumption in rats.
Also, TDE effects were similar to those of galanthamine, as demonstrated in this study, and those of physostigmine in a previous study.
None were administered physostigmine. Their neurologic statuses improved during hospitalization and were normal by the time of discharge.