physiology

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physiology

 [fiz″e-ol´o-je]
1. the science that treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.
cell physiology the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology (pathologic physiology) the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē),
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

/phys·i·ol·o·gy/ (-je)
1. the science which treats of the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.

morbid physiology , pathologic physiology the study of disordered function or of function in diseased tissues.

physiology

(fĭz′ē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The biological study of the functions of living organisms and their parts.
2. All the functions of a living organism or any of its parts.

phys′i·ol′o·gist n.

physiology

[fiz′ē·ol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, physis + logos, science
1 the study of the processes and function of the human body.
2 the study of the physical and chemical processes involved in the functioning of organisms and their parts. Kinds of physiology include comparative physiology, developmental physiology, hominal physiology, and pathological physiology. Compare anatomy.

physiology

See Applied physiology, Cardiac electrophysiology, Clinical neurophysiology.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the normal vital processes of animal and vegetable organisms, especially as to how things normally function in the living organism rather than as to their anatomic structure, their biochemical composition, or how they are affected by drugs or disease.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology

The study of the functioning of living organisms, especially the human organism. Physiology includes BIOCHEMISTRY but this is such a large discipline that it is followed as a separate speciality. Together with ANATOMY and PATHOLOGY, physiology is the basis of medical science.

physiology

the study in animals, plants and microorganisms of those internal processes and functions associated with life.

physiology

the branch of biological science concerned with the normal bodily function of living organisms, hence physiologist. Also those functions themselves, as for example the physiology of digestion, of vision, of locomotion, etc. adj physiological.

physiology,

n in biological sciences, study concerned with the processes and functioning of organisms.

phys·i·ol·o·gy

(fiz'ē-ol'ŏ-jē)
Science concerned with normal vital processes of organisms, especially as to how things normally function in living organism rather than to their anatomic structure.
[L. or G. physiologia, fr. G. physis, nature, + logos, study]

physiology (fiz´ēol´əjē),

n the study of tissue and organism behavior. The physiologic process is a dynamic state of tissue as compared with the static state of descriptive morphology (anatomy). Physiology is differentiated from descriptive morphology by the following qualifying properties: rate, direction, and magnitude. Physiologic processes are thus morphologic alterations in the three dimensions of space associated with a temporary (time) sequence. Physiologic processes relate to a wide spectrum of life activities on three levels: biochemical and biophysical activity of a subcellular nature, the activity of cells and tissues aggregated into organ systems, and multiorgan system activity as expressed in human behavior.
physiology, oral,
n the physiology related to clinical manifestations in the normal and abnormal behavior of oral structures. The principal clinical functions in which the oral structures participate are deglutition, mastication, respiration, speech, and head posture.

physiology

1. the science which deals with the functions of the living organism and its parts, and of the physical and chemical factors and processes involved.
2. the basic processes underlying the functioning of a species or class of organism, or any of its parts or processes.

cell physiology
the scientific study of phenomena involved in cell growth and maintenance, self-regulation and division of cells, interactions between nucleus and cytoplasm, and general behavior of protoplasm.
morbid physiology, pathological physiology
the study of disordered functions or of function in diseased tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
People continually communicate their conscious and subconscious thoughts physiologically, nonverbally, and verbally.
Fluxion's technology facilitates the characterization of molecular and cellular mechanisms in physiologically relevant microenvironments.
We have shown that SAP is bound by fibrils of amyloid beta and that this interaction stabilises the fibrils over timescales which are physiologically significant," said Exley.
Baxter recalls that when, just a few days after arriving on campus, he first met Shuler, "we immediately saw a fit for miniaturized systems to make [Shuler's setups] more physiologically realistic.
So saying, since mirror-image couples are physiologically "unequipped" to consummate, so must pervert, ought not this severe impediment, of and by its nature, constitute the same invalidity, particularly in the case of a religious ceremony?
Humans aren't physiologically designed to eat meat.
a) the inferolateral resection of inferior turbinate with preservation of the mucosa of the medial aspect of the inferior turbinate to facilitate the entry of inspired air more into the inferior meatus than into the middle meatus (this physiologically increases the inspiratory flow rate along the inferior meatus).
A good warm-up is important both psychologically and physiologically.
Years later, when translating French texts into English, I struggled so hard with the meaning of certain complex sentences that I was sure I felt this struggle physiologically inside my brain - the little currents of electricity sparked, traveled, leaped forward against the problem, fell back, leaped again from a different side, failed.
They are formulated into a topically applicable, physiologically acceptable medium.
has written a technical article about a new method to control and direct differentiation of physiologically relevant neural cell types using stem cell qualified reagents.
The study participants had their body fat percentage, waist circumference, BMI measured and were physiologically assessed for hot flashes by use of a monitor that measured skin conductance.

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