physiological psychology


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

physiological psychology

n.
The branch of psychology that studies the neurobiological basis of cognition, emotion, and behavior. Also called psychophysiology.

physiological psychologist n.

physiological psychology

the study of the interrelationship of physiological and psychological processes, especially the effects of a change from normal to abnormal.

physiological psychology

Psychology that deals with the structure and function of the nervous system and other bodily organs and their relationship to behavior.
See also: psychology
References in periodicals archive ?
In Germany in particular, where Empfindsamkeit was influenced by the Sturm und Drang's physiological psychology and its ideal of manly vigour, the literature of sensibility (not only of the satirical variety) was often directed against exaggerated sentimentality.
Jean Paul borrows some of the vitalistic, physiological psychology in Abelard und Heloise from Goethe.
in Physiological Psychology in 1986, both from the University of Louisville.
The curriculum of the Catholic university must thus consider both Physiological Psychology and Cognitive Psychology, yet always within the context of the history of psychology as well as philosophical and theological explorations of personhood.
Education: Attended Northeastern University, majoring in physiological psychology
Drawing on Victorian physiological psychology, Austin shows how Thomas Laycock, George Henry Lewes, and Alexander Bain viewed memory as a motor-sensory mechanism based in the spinal cord.
This, of course, was to develop into Problems of Physiological Psychology (Kantor, 1947).
Rachlin argues that behavior analysis is actually studying mental life while cognitive and physiological psychology are studying mental (internal) mechanisms.

Full browser ?