physiognomy


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physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]
References in periodicals archive ?
THE SCIENCES OF PHRENOLOGY AND PHYSIOGNOMY: PREDICTING CHARACTER BEHAVIOR
In such a space, in which bodies are subject to a polymorphous incitement to approximate a physiognomy or topography of whiteness, we observe a proliferation of images of racial approximation.
Ancient Physiognomy is identified as a separate field of enquiry well before Plato.(7) Its origin is traced back to Pythagoras (Hippol.
Before I demonstrate Dryden's use of Porta's physiognomy, it may be useful to offer some background information on the subject.
But a stylistic chameleon like Schrauwen resists this expressionist Rorschach test himself; rather, his restless experimentation with different visual approaches, married to his thematic concerns, implies a deeper investigation into the physiognomy of style.
A new physiognomy of Jewish thinking; critical theory after Adorno as applied to Jewish thought.
There is nothing morally wrong with that - it's a basic reaction that's impossible to ignore: we're all hard-wired to sift, sort, pigeon-hole and put aside according to what first greets us, namely the physiognomy and physicality of a person.
And it's cheaper than Botox." It turns out that her extreme physiognomy manipulation followed her getting hold of the results of new research about frowning and how to stop it.
In four similarly constructed chapters, Delaporte addresses Duchenne's innovations from the perspective of different disciplines: the anatomy of facial muscles, or myology; photography and the tradition of physiognomy; systems of expression; and the aesthetic treatment of the passions.
Photographs were taken of Indians illustrating the British preoccupation with scientific measurement of physiognomy, a technique intended to demonstrate a link between race and caste.
Topics on ecosystems and landscapes include processes and landscape ecology and those on global patterns and processes include climate and physiognomy, biomes, regional and global diversity, paleoecology and change in the relation between people and plants.
Floating with the wind in and out of the room, the images of Davou's magnetic Mediterranean physiognomy appeared and disappeared; like multiples of Veronica's veil, they exposed their iconic fragility as if to remind us of the significance of remembrance--a need that eludes any city limits.