physiognomy

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Related to physiognomist: cicatrised, physiognomies

physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]
References in periodicals archive ?
perennial trope used as much by the Enlightenment physiognomist as the
Like The Concubine, "The Physiognomist" is the work of a pious expatriate worried about how luxury and corruption were preying upon a commercial nation.
For the physiognomist knows the character and intentions, so to say, of all people, as if by a god-sent and unmistakable prophecy.
Seeking for correspondences between body and character, Classical and Renaissance physiognomists insisted that the nature of man, through the humors, is written on his face.
Johann Casper Lavater, a well-known physiognomist of Austen's day, delineated detailed claims about how specific features of the head, face and overall body type directly communicate a person's character and disposition.
Polemon was a skilled physiognomist, who read the looks and actions of others as reliable signs of innate character in his own ostentatious act as a virtuous arbiter of the social good.
We asked Naomi Tickle, a leading physiognomist and author of a best selling book on face reading to analyse Mr Blair's smile.
Studies by physiognomist Alfred Linney of the Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College, London, observed that the Cassandra and Clarke portraits show women with similar hairstyles and face shapes.
As a youth he was told by a physiognomist that, once punished, he would eventually become king.
The California-based physiognomist (face-reader) says low-set, straight eyebrows and a long jaw are the traits to look for in a passionate partner.
Like Renaissance physiognomists and Protestant prognosticators, savvy English merchants inventoried the anomalies of physical form to assign them value, not ethical or theological value, but financial value.
(1.) An interesting example of the second type is the story about the portrait of Moses, which tells of a king who ordered a portrait of Moses, which was interpreted by physiognomists to represent the likeness of a very evil person.