physiognomy

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Related to physiognomist: cicatrised, physiognomies

physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

/phys·i·og·no·my/ (fiz″e-og´nah-me)
1. determination of mental or moral character and qualities by the face.
2. the countenance, or face.
3. the facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

[fiz′ë·og′nəmē]
Etymology: Gk, physis, nature, gnosis, knowledge
a method of judging the personality and other characteristics of a client by studying the face and general carriage of the body.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy (fiz´ēog´nəmē),

facial features.
References in periodicals archive ?
perennial trope used as much by the Enlightenment physiognomist as the
806a, which stresses that not all affections (pathemata) are of interest to the physiognomist, and that not all bodily characteristics can be used as physiognomic signs.
Classical and Renaissance physiognomists devote considerable attention to ways of countering naturally vicious dispositions, after they have registered the marks present at birth.
25) In a culture where gender is a matter of performance as well as anatomy, Polemon in his role as physiognomist clings to an extremely conservative taxonomy of gender, class, and ethnicity.
The California-based physiognomist (face-reader) says low-set, straight eyebrows and a long jaw are the traits to look for in a passionate partner.
An interesting example of the second type is the story about the portrait of Moses, which tells of a king who ordered a portrait of Moses, which was interpreted by physiognomists to represent the likeness of a very evil person.
Phrenologists assigned values like "Dutifulness" and "Agreeableness" to bumps on your head, while physiognomists saw them in the shape of your nose.
In the writing of later physiognomists, "looking and eye-contact is fundamentally regulated by the display rules and social norms that form part of the ideologies" (Cairns 2005a, 130); the citizen man was marked by his straightforward look, which distinguished him from modest women and boys, madmen, and the kinaidos (Cairns 2005a, 129, 130, 146-7 notes 16-9; Bremmer and Roodenburg 1992, 23).
Her hair and eyebrows were jet black (these latter may have been too thick according to some physiognomists, giving a rather stern expression to the eyes, and hence causing those guilty ones to tremble who came under her lash), but her complexion was .
Relying on supposedly empirical data, physiognomists and phrenologists reported distinctions between the bone structure of tinkers, who could be recognized by their strong jaws and cheekbones, and those of settled people whose prominent bones encased rational brains.
Schopenhauer, in a little-known essay assessing the merits of the pseudo-science of physiognomy, approvingly noted that, in methodological terms, physiognomists merely attempt to formalize a principle of human psychology that we employ all the time: "every human face is a hieroglyphic which can certainly be deciphered, in fact whose alphabet we carry about ready-made.
The combination of good proportions, blonde hair and a youthful beard strongly suggests the lion-type familiar from the descriptions of ancient physiognomists.