physiognomy

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Related to physiognomies: augured, betokened

physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]
References in periodicals archive ?
(17) After Polemon /Adamantius, the approach is reversed to a head-to-toe system, known in Latin as a capite ad calcem in Greco-Roman physiognomies. It was first noticed in the Akkadian texts from Mesopotamian cuneiform tablets and later adopted in the Aristotelian book on animal anatomy (see below) and Greek traditions of medicine and rhetoric.
In Indian physiognomies, on the other hand, the toe-to-head orientation is the preferred method of inspection, being first seen in the women's marks (strilaksanani) in Garga and fixed as the norm for both genders from Varahamihira's Brhatsamhita (sixth century CE).
The instability of the toe-to-head orientation in early Greek physiognomies further indicates that it was not an instinctive form of behavior, learned over many generations; rather it appears to be an anomaly in the literature, come from somewhere else.
The toe-to-head system dominates the principal transmissions and versions of physiognomies found in India.
The bottom-up orientation would, therefore, appear to be traceable to the Indian tradition of physiognomies.
(25) It is clear that the method and its procedure are based on behavior well ingrained in Indian life and culture, while in ancient Greece it was a technique very possibly introduced into the literature from among the basic tenets of Indian physiognomies. Therefore, the evidence thus far marshalled would rather strongly suggest that Tractate B of the ps.-Aristotle's Physiognomonika could well derive in part from material that was shared mutually between the Indian and Greek physiognomic traditions, even though chronologically the Greek version appears to be older than any of the extant Indian brahmanic transmissions.
Finally, both Indian and Greek systems of physiognomics share a common storehouse of knowledge with their respective medical traditions, a feature that they have in common with Mesopotamian physiognomies.
We now turn our attention to the third point of similarity between Indian and Greek physiognomies, which has not been addressed in my recent study.
Nematode-induced galls accounted for fruit destruction in 76.5% of infructescences across physiognomies (Table 5), but their incidence was poorly related to architectural variables (Table 2).
Cerrado species growing in distinct physiognomies exhibit strong variation in morphological, anatomical and physiological traits.
Vegetation physiognomies and woody flora of the cerrado biome.
Principal components (PCI) and (PC2) obtained from the matrix of correlation of architectural parameters for Miconia albicans in three Cerrado physiognomies. Architectural parameter PCI PC2 Height (cm) 0.45 0.72 Secondary shoot number 0.54 0.22 Tertiary shoot number 0.52 -0.31 Quaternary shoot number 0.47 -0.59 Variance explained (%) 74.4 17.4 Table 5.