physiognomy

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Related to physiognomically: physiognomist, physiognomies

physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

/phys·i·og·no·my/ (fiz″e-og´nah-me)
1. determination of mental or moral character and qualities by the face.
2. the countenance, or face.
3. the facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

[fiz′ë·og′nəmē]
Etymology: Gk, physis, nature, gnosis, knowledge
a method of judging the personality and other characteristics of a client by studying the face and general carriage of the body.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy (fiz´ēog´nəmē),

facial features.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, this slippage would make sense since it is well known that "in the late nineteenth century, the Irish were most explicitly described as physiognomically similar to African Americans.
Hence, on lithosols and regosols derived from acidic and basic igneous rocks, microphyllous and sandy microphyllous deserts are replaced by sarcocaulescent desert, an open woodland physiognomically dominated by columnar cacti and many deciduous small trees that have fleshy stems of swollen appearance (sarcocaulescent of Shreve and Wiggins, 1964).
t]he Court of Appeals was thus quite right in holding that [section] 1981, 'at a minimum,' reaches discrimination against an individual 'because he or she is genetically part of an ethnically and physiognomically distinctive sub-grouping of homo sapiens,'" and "that a distinctive physiognomy is not essential to qualify for [section] 1981 protection.