physiognomy

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Related to physiognomical: physiognomy, physiognomist

physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

/phys·i·og·no·my/ (fiz″e-og´nah-me)
1. determination of mental or moral character and qualities by the face.
2. the countenance, or face.
3. the facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

[fiz′ë·og′nəmē]
Etymology: Gk, physis, nature, gnosis, knowledge
a method of judging the personality and other characteristics of a client by studying the face and general carriage of the body.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy (fiz´ēog´nəmē),

facial features.
References in periodicals archive ?
If one interprets the word generally to mean relating to external physical appearance, then one could argue that skin color is a physiognomical difference.
In fact, it was the `Christianisation' of physiognomical theory that inspired many interpretations of the Monstrous Races by medieval moralists, who recognised their potential as effective symbolic vehicles.
The same fundamental ideas also appear in later physiognomical treatises, and notably in the eclectic methods of the pseudo-Aristotelian handbook.
38) Every reading of signs and inscription of signs in the novel has a physiognomical character, including the names.
Eliot drew upon similar physiognomical beliefs in her characterization of Tertius Lydgate in Middlemarch (1872) when Lady Chettam observes, "I am told [Lydgate] is wonderfully clever: he certainly looks it--a fine brow indeed" (89).
However, both the grassy and woody vegetation of the central Apennines is easily distinguishable from the coenological and physiognomical impact of the amphi-Adriatic component which is due to the common paleoclimatical and paleobotanical events shared by the central Apennines and the Dynarids.
In the following essay, Jessica Cox focuses on Collins's heroines and Collins's use of physiognomical codes to both reveal and conceal character.
38) Here physiognomical details are very close to those of the ancient sculpture, (39) though what unites the two heads above all is the similarity of characterisation as a dignified and guarded figure, one that is also on guard, as indicated by the turn of the head and the gaze.
64), or "The Nimrud Catalogue of Medical and Physiognomical Omina," J.
33) Stanley Renner, '"Red hair, very red, close-curling": Sexual Hysteria, Physiognomical Bogeymen, and the "Ghost" in The Turn of the Screw', in Henry James, The Turn of the Screw, ed.
By the seventeenth century, an extensive body of physiognomical texts was available.
24) Stewart traces Alexander's full hairstyle to his status as the lion-like ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) man of physiognomical theory.