physiognomy

(redirected from physiognomic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to physiognomic: flywhisk

physiognomy

 [fiz″e-og´no-me]
1. facial expression and appearance as a means of diagnosis.
2. the attempt to determine temperament and character on the basis of facial features.

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nō-mē),
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

physiognomy

(fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. physiogno·mies
Facial features.

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.
History of psychiatry The formal study of the human face; for a brief period after C Lombroso’s publication of L’Uomo Delinquente (1876), certain facial and other physical features were used to classify criminals—e.g., small restless eyes were thought to be typical of thieves, or bright eyes and cracked voices of sex criminals
Quackery A pseudodiagnostic technique based on the belief that personality and emotions can be deciphered by evaluating facial features or lines on the body

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nŏ-mē)
1. The physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
2. Estimation of one's character and mental qualities by a study of the face and other external bodily features.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]

phys·i·og·no·my

(fiz'ē-og'nǒ-mē)
Physical appearance of one's face, countenance, or habitus, especially regarded as an indication of character.
[physio- + G. gnōmōn, a judge]
References in periodicals archive ?
We have thus far pointed to two important similarities between early Greek and Sanskrit physiognomic literature:
A set of experiments comprised of a number of supervised classifiers (kNearest Neighbors (KNN), Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB), Random Forests (RF), Support Vector Machines (SVM), and Neural Network-Multilayer Perceptron (MLP)) with different model parameters was assessed for better discrimination of vegetation physiognomic types.
(8.) Examples of physiognomic scrutiny can be found in Lady Susan and Northanger Abbey.
Therefore, generalisation of settlements should be subordinated to the principles and constraints of visual perception on the one hand, and on the other this process should take into account the characteristic spatial, physiognomic and functional features of settlements.
The new settlement reported in this work, the Islote Lobos, presents the typical physiognomic characteristics that have been described for most of the SAFS colonies: rocky, steep, isolated from the continent and with tide pools (Vaz-Ferreira, 1960; Schiavini, 1987; Bastida & Rodriguez, 1994; Crespo et al.
The fact that THE SET-TOO does not report the Jewish phase of the riots but rather formed part of the discourse of this phase by an accident of timing is made all the more ironic by future prints which made increasingly explicit the physiognomic connections between Dan Mendoza and John Philip Kemble.
Writers were attracted to physiognomic thinking; it influenced the descriptions of characters in Balzac, Dickens, Hardy, and Charlotte Bronte.
The two sexes are highlighted as are the shades of skin colour, the signifiers of religious observance or lack thereof and the physiognomic features of ethnic categorisation.
As we reported, Dai seems to exhibit no special physiognomic talents when he's going about his daily habits, liKe gardening.