physician stress

physician stress

Medical practice The mental stress of medical practice–eg, responsibility for life and health, long working hrs, examination of unclothed Pts–with the potential for boundary violations, threat of malpractice litigation, ready access to psychoactive and addicting drugs, financial concerns, and need to keep current in one's scope of practice
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Physician stress is a topic that has received considerable attention during the past two decades.
Electronic medical records and physician stress in primary care: results from the MEMO study.
Interventions for managing physician stress and burnout include cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT); mindfulness-based stress reduction programs; relaxation/stretching exercises; supportive discussion strategies such as Balint sessions (group therapy for doctors which focuses on patient-physician relationships); changing work settings and reduction of adverse job psychosocial factors; self-care lectures; didactic/interactive sessions; and counseling and psychosocial training.
Physician stress and burnout can lead to increased turnover and recruitment challenges, lower staff morale, reduced work hours and increased medical errors - all issues healthcare organizations under financial pressure can ill afford.
Similarly, Factor 2 (items 2, 4, 9 and 15; 'physician stress') explained 12.9%, Factor 3 (items 7, 13 and 17; 'interpersonal stress') explained 10.8%, and Factor 4 (items 5, 6, 11, 12; 'compliance to regimen') explained 7.7% of the total variance (Table-2).
Conclusion: Primary care physicians may be motivated to integrate behavioral health services into their clinics knowing that other physicians believe that it directly and indirectly improves patient care and physician stress.
Combating Physician Stress. Hospital & Health Networks Daily; April 12, 2012.
The present study aims to gain a better understanding of the turnover process by examining the stress-burnout-turnover linkage, addressing two additional factors: doctor-patient interactions as an emerged key factor on physician stress; and physician commitment as a key personal resource in order to prevent burnout.
As a result of these concerns there is understandably a great amount of physician stress. Anxiety related to learning, choosing, coping with and applying quality guidelines is apparent.
Practices that provided support for work-life balance, that emphasized quality, and had congruent values among physicians and leadership had less physician stress and burnout.
Several recent studies demonstrate a significant level of physician stress and dissatisfaction nationwide (Landon et al.

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