physical status classification

physical status classification

 A classifying of physical condition by the Am Soc of Anesthesiologists that stratifies Pts undergoing surgery into categories of relative risk of suffering complications during surgery or in the immediate post-operative period
Physical status classification
Class 1 No organic, physiologic, biochemical, or psychiatric disturbance; the pathologic process for which the operation is to be performed is localized, and does not entail a systemic disturbance, eg inguinal hernia repair in a robust ♂
Class 2 Mild to moderate disturbance caused either by the condition being treated surgically, or by a physiopathologic derangement, eg mild cardiac disease, mild DM, chronic bronchitis, essential hypertension
Class 3 Severe systemic disease or derangement of any cause, which may defy classification, eg severe cardiac disease, angina or status post-MI, severe diabetes with vascular complications, moderate to severe pulmonary compromise
Class 4 Severe systemic disease that is already life-threatening, which may not be corrected by surgery, eg organic heart disease with signs of severe cardiac insufficiency, advanced pulmonary, hepatic, renal or endocrine insufficiency
Class 5 A moribund patient with little chance of survival who is submitted to an operation in desperation, eg ruptured aortic aneurysm, major cerebral trauma with rapidly ↑ intracranial pressure
Emergency operation E A designation for any of the above classes when the operation 'goes sour', eg an incarcerated hernia with strangulation would be a class 1E  
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The physical status classification system of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA),13 which is shown in Table-II, is commonly used in the preoperative evaluation of patients.
Table: ASA physical status classification system for assessing fitness for surgery.
Type of surgery, American society of anaesthesiology grade, Physical status classification, Body mass index, Age of the patient, Duration of surgery, Emergency status and Epidural analgesia.
Care outcomes were identical for either population, and included the time required to position the patient, the patient's BMI, the patient's American Society of Anesthesiology physical status classification, the patient's Braden Scale score, and any documented evidence of post-operative skin compromise.
Comparison of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification with the Charlson score as predictors of survival after radical prostatectomy.
To be enrolled, patients in both groups had to be [less than or equal to]12 years of age, have an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification of P1 or P2, and had to have undergone no adjunctive procedure with the myringotomy.
After statistical adjustment for patient age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification, the hip fracture repair patients were 3.
An assessment of the consistency of ASA physical status classification allocation [see comments].
The American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) Physical Status Classification was as follows: I (n=21); II (n=66), III (n=13) indicating patients' overall health and burden of co-morbid conditions.
Based upon the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System, 43% of patients were classified as P3 (having severe systemic disease), or P4 (having systemic disease that is a constant threat to life).
Methods: Mothers meeting the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification system (ASA) I or II, who underwent caesarean sections at our hospital were surveyed retrospectively.
Based upon the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System, 52% of patients in this study were classified as P2 (having mild systemic disease such as asthma, obesity or diabetes mellitus), 37% were P3 (having severe systemic disease such as cardiovascular disease that limits activity or severe diabetes with systemic complications), and 6% were P4 (having systemic disease that is a constant threat to life, such as unstable angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular accident within the past six months).