physical

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physical

 [fiz´ĭ-kal]
pertaining to the body, to material things, or to physics.
physical fitness a state of physiologic well being that is achieved through a combination of good diet, regular physical exercise, and other practices that promote good health.
physical therapist a rehabilitation professional who promotes optimal health and functional independence through the application of scientific principles to prevent, identify, assess, correct, or alleviate acute or chronic movement dysfunction, physical disability, or pain. A physical therapist is a graduate of a physical therapy program approved by a nationally recognized accrediting body or has achieved the documented equivalent in education, training, or experience; in addition, the therapist must meet any current legal requirements of licensure or registration and be currently competent in the field.

Persons wishing to practice as qualified physical therapists must be licensed. All 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico require such licensure. All applicants for licensure must have a degree or certificate from an accredited physical therapy educational program. To qualify for licensure they must pass a state licensure examination.

Physical therapy assistants and aides work under the supervision of professional physical therapists. Training requirements for physical therapy assistants are not uniform throughout the United States. In 39 of the states licensure is available to graduates of an accredited two-year associate degree program; some require the passing of a written examination. Physical therapy aides can qualify for that position by training on the job in hospitals and other health care facilities.

Further information about the curriculum for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, available programs of study, requirements for practice, and other relevant information can be obtained by contacting the American Physical Therapy Association, 1111 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, VA 22314, telephone (703) 684–2782.
physical therapy the profession practiced by licensed physical therapists. According to guidelines published by the American Physical Therapy Association, physical therapy should be defined as the examination, treatment, and instruction of persons in order to detect, assess, prevent, correct, alleviate, and limit physical disability and bodily malfunction. The practice of physical therapy includes the administration, interpretation, and evaluation of tests and measurements of bodily functions and structures and the planning, administration, evaluation, and modification of treatment and instruction, including the use of physical measures, activities, and devices, for preventive and therapeutic purposes. Additionally, it provides consultative, educational, and other advisory services for the purpose of reducing the incidence and severity of physical disability, bodily malfunction, movement dysfunction, and pain.
chest physical therapy a form of respiratory therapy in which the patient is positioned to facilitate removal of secretions (postural drainage) and the chest wall is clapped to help loosen the secretions (percussion).

phys·i·cal

(fiz'i-kăl),
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
[Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

physical

(fĭz′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the body.
b. Having a physiological basis or origin: a physical craving for an addictive drug.
c. Involving sexual interest or activity: a physical attraction; physical intimacy.
2.
a. Involving or characterized by vigorous or forceful bodily activity: physical aggression; a fast and physical dance performance.
b. Slang Involving or characterized by violence: "A real cop would get physical" (TV Guide).
3. Of or relating to material things: a wall that formed a physical barrier; the physical environment.
4. Of or relating to matter and energy or the sciences dealing with them, especially physics.
n.
A physical examination.

phys′i·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē) n.
phys′i·cal·ly adv.

physical

adjective
1. Referring to the body.
2. Referring to the laws of physics and the universe noun Popular for physical examination, see there.

phys·i·cal

(fiz'i-kăl)
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
[Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

phys·i·cal

(fiz'i-kăl)
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
[Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

Patient discussion about physical

Q. how does physical training, as lifting weight effects your body?

A. It increases the mass of the trained muscles, so you may gain weight, but the percentage of fat decreases. It also makes the body spend more calories after the exercise and during rest (although this effect m may be more subtle than once was thought to be).

Weight lifting may also improve your ability to control your muscles, standing and gait.

You should know that there's a fundamental difference between aerobic exercise (e.g. running, swimming) and anaerobic exercise (e.g. weight lifting). While the first improves mainly the heart, the latter affects mainly the exercised muscles

You may want to read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/exerciseandphysicalfitness.html

Q. Are there any other physical aspects of depression? I’m William, 55 years, male. I’m suffering from depression and on medication for a long period. I wish to know is there any chance for me to get heart disease? Are there any other physical aspects of depression?

A. Cardiovascular disease comes with poor diet and exercise. That can arise as a result of not taking your self because of depression. Its not easy to make yourself get up and do something physical. Its not easy to eat properly all the time.

On the flip side its real easy to lay around and do nothing and watch TV and not get involved in anything. Its real easy to stuff yourself on bad foods and drink. Its real easy to avoid the things that lead to good health. Weight gain can result in type 2 diabetes. All this can lead to a stroke or heart attack or death.

You get to decide which side of the flip you want to land on. You are stuck with whatever consequences that gives you.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has a twelve step process of recovery. Those twelve steps would help a depressive person recover. Just substitute the word depression for alcohol in the AA twelve steps. Those twelve steps are easy to find out about. Just do a simple internet search. I am a recovering alcoholic. I a

Q. what causes physical exhaustion

A. Many things may cause weakness, depending on the specific characteristics of the individual and the situation. Heart diseases (stable angina) may cause weakness, as well as anemia, metabolic disorders (potassium abnormalities etc.). Other situations such as chronic diseases may also cause weakness.

However, I'm not very keen on diagnosing things over the net, so consulting a professional (e.g. a doctor) may be wise.
You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003174.htm

More discussions about physical
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the comparison of age, gender, and the physical findings between the MWI-effective and ineffective groups, the only significant difference was in the MAIB, indicating that MWI may be less effective for children with severe metatarsus adductus.
Physical findings revealed central obesity, multiple bruises, thinning of the skin, buffalo hump and high blood pressure (200/110 mmHg).
Only Patients in group B with global developmental delay who had no abnormal physical findings pointing to a specific etiology had a normal CT of brain.
"Polycystic ovaries and insulin resistance may be suspected if a woman has any of the symptoms or physical findings noted above.
Physical findings that correlate much better with airway obstruction include diminished breath sounds and prolonged exhalation time (>6 seconds).
However, the combined presence of several key physical findings highlighted in this case report defy a common diagnostic label and appear to warrant additional consideration.
Although certain physical findings were discussed, this area could have
Symptoms alone, with no physical findings or objective explanations, have limited diagnostic value, Gots said.
Notable physical findings included enlarged tonsils and a white exudate on the right tonsil.
Each chapter considers organ-specific diseases in alphabetical order and provides details such as key diagnostic tests and associated laboratory and physical findings. For example, in the chapter on cardiovascular diseases, 6 pages are spent discussing the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, including a diagnostic algorithm, a graph of cardiac enzyme levels, and 3 tables showing the specificity and sensitivity of each marker.
SINGE THE DAWN OF human history, there has been a recurrent cultural "syndrome." Defined as the pattern of symptoms, physical findings, or other stereotypical events, a syndrome indicates a particular social condition.