physical


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Related to physical: physical fitness, physical education

physical

 [fiz´ĭ-kal]
pertaining to the body, to material things, or to physics.
physical fitness a state of physiologic well being that is achieved through a combination of good diet, regular physical exercise, and other practices that promote good health.
physical therapist a rehabilitation professional who promotes optimal health and functional independence through the application of scientific principles to prevent, identify, assess, correct, or alleviate acute or chronic movement dysfunction, physical disability, or pain. A physical therapist is a graduate of a physical therapy program approved by a nationally recognized accrediting body or has achieved the documented equivalent in education, training, or experience; in addition, the therapist must meet any current legal requirements of licensure or registration and be currently competent in the field.

Persons wishing to practice as qualified physical therapists must be licensed. All 50 states of the United States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico require such licensure. All applicants for licensure must have a degree or certificate from an accredited physical therapy educational program. To qualify for licensure they must pass a state licensure examination.

Physical therapy assistants and aides work under the supervision of professional physical therapists. Training requirements for physical therapy assistants are not uniform throughout the United States. In 39 of the states licensure is available to graduates of an accredited two-year associate degree program; some require the passing of a written examination. Physical therapy aides can qualify for that position by training on the job in hospitals and other health care facilities.

Further information about the curriculum for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, available programs of study, requirements for practice, and other relevant information can be obtained by contacting the American Physical Therapy Association, 1111 N. Fairfax St., Alexandria, VA 22314, telephone (703) 684–2782.
physical therapy the profession practiced by licensed physical therapists. According to guidelines published by the American Physical Therapy Association, physical therapy should be defined as the examination, treatment, and instruction of persons in order to detect, assess, prevent, correct, alleviate, and limit physical disability and bodily malfunction. The practice of physical therapy includes the administration, interpretation, and evaluation of tests and measurements of bodily functions and structures and the planning, administration, evaluation, and modification of treatment and instruction, including the use of physical measures, activities, and devices, for preventive and therapeutic purposes. Additionally, it provides consultative, educational, and other advisory services for the purpose of reducing the incidence and severity of physical disability, bodily malfunction, movement dysfunction, and pain.
chest physical therapy a form of respiratory therapy in which the patient is positioned to facilitate removal of secretions (postural drainage) and the chest wall is clapped to help loosen the secretions (percussion).

phys·i·cal

(fiz'i-kăl),
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
[Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

physical

/phys·i·cal/ (fiz´ik-il) pertaining to the body, to material things, or to physics.

physical

(fĭz′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the body.
b. Having a physiological basis or origin: a physical craving for an addictive drug.
c. Involving sexual interest or activity: a physical attraction; physical intimacy.
2.
a. Involving or characterized by vigorous or forceful bodily activity: physical aggression; a fast and physical dance performance.
b. Slang Involving or characterized by violence: "A real cop would get physical" (TV Guide).
3. Of or relating to material things: a wall that formed a physical barrier; the physical environment.
4. Of or relating to matter and energy or the sciences dealing with them, especially physics.
n.
A physical examination.

phys′i·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē) n.
phys′i·cal·ly adv.

physical

adjective
1. Referring to the body.
2. Referring to the laws of physics and the universe noun Popular for physical examination, see there.

phys·i·cal

(fiz'i-kăl)
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
[Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

phys·i·cal

(fiz'i-kăl)
Relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
[Mod. L. physicalis, fr. G. physikos]

physical,

adj relating to the body, as distinguished from the mind.
physical examination,
n a diagnostic inspection of the body to determine its state of health, using palpation, auscultation, percussion, and smell.
physical fitness,
n the ability to carry out daily tasks with alertness and vigor, without undue fatigue, and with enough energy reserve to meet emergencies or to enjoy leisure time.
physical medicine,
n the use of physical therapy techniques to return physically diseased or injured patients to a useful life.
physical plant,
n the entire architectural and decorated suite of offices in which the dental professional operates.
physical therapy,
n the treatment of disorders with physical agents and methods, such as massage, manipulation, therapeutic exercises, cold, heat (including shortwave, microwave, and ultrasonic diathermy), hydrotherapy, electric stimulation, and light to assist in rehabilitating patients and in restoring normal function after an illness or injury. Also called
physiotherapy.

physical

pertaining to the body, to material things, or to physics.

physical agent
the physical causes of disease. Includes altitude, radiation, wetness, exercise, fire, electricity including lightning.
physical diagnosis
a preliminary diagnosis made solely on the basis of a physical examination. Often all that is possible in private practice.
physical examination
examination of the bodily state of a patient by ordinary physical means, as inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation.
physical exhaustion
see physical exhaustion.
physical findings
results of a physical examination. Observations made visually, by auscultation, palpation, smell, percussion, succussion and ballottement.
physical fitness
quality of being able to perform physically, to turn in a good physical performance. Best tested by performance but in horses can be vaguely predicted by a series of tests including hemoglobin content of blood, heart size, duration of the QRS interval on an ECG, and low levels of muscle enzymes in blood.
physical insults
physical agencies that cause disease. These include trauma, stress (physical as in stress fracture of long bones in horses), hyperthermia (as a cause of congenital defects), persistent wetting, high altitude, lightning stroke, electrocution, bushfire and fire injury, volcanic eruption and exposure to radiation.
physical map
in genetics, determination of the array of genes within a DNA segment of a chromosome.
physical restraint
the use of halters, collars and chains, ropes, harness, twitches of various sorts, squeeze cages, hog holders, dog catchers and many more devices. As distinct from the use of analeptic agents—chemical restraint.
physical stress
see stress.
physical therapist
one who is skilled in the physical and therapeutic techniques of helping to alleviate suffering from muscle, nerve, joint and bone diseases and from injuries and to overcome or prevent disabilities. Among the procedures used by the physical therapist are exercise to increase strength, endurance, coordination, and range of motion; electrical stimulation to activate paralyzed muscles; massage, vibrators and many other patented devices to try to improve the circulation and condition of a part. Called also physiotherapist.

Patient discussion about physical

Q. how does physical training, as lifting weight effects your body?

A. It increases the mass of the trained muscles, so you may gain weight, but the percentage of fat decreases. It also makes the body spend more calories after the exercise and during rest (although this effect m may be more subtle than once was thought to be).

Weight lifting may also improve your ability to control your muscles, standing and gait.

You should know that there's a fundamental difference between aerobic exercise (e.g. running, swimming) and anaerobic exercise (e.g. weight lifting). While the first improves mainly the heart, the latter affects mainly the exercised muscles

You may want to read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/exerciseandphysicalfitness.html

Q. Are there any other physical aspects of depression? I’m William, 55 years, male. I’m suffering from depression and on medication for a long period. I wish to know is there any chance for me to get heart disease? Are there any other physical aspects of depression?

A. Cardiovascular disease comes with poor diet and exercise. That can arise as a result of not taking your self because of depression. Its not easy to make yourself get up and do something physical. Its not easy to eat properly all the time.

On the flip side its real easy to lay around and do nothing and watch TV and not get involved in anything. Its real easy to stuff yourself on bad foods and drink. Its real easy to avoid the things that lead to good health. Weight gain can result in type 2 diabetes. All this can lead to a stroke or heart attack or death.

You get to decide which side of the flip you want to land on. You are stuck with whatever consequences that gives you.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has a twelve step process of recovery. Those twelve steps would help a depressive person recover. Just substitute the word depression for alcohol in the AA twelve steps. Those twelve steps are easy to find out about. Just do a simple internet search. I am a recovering alcoholic. I a

Q. what causes physical exhaustion

A. Many things may cause weakness, depending on the specific characteristics of the individual and the situation. Heart diseases (stable angina) may cause weakness, as well as anemia, metabolic disorders (potassium abnormalities etc.). Other situations such as chronic diseases may also cause weakness.

However, I'm not very keen on diagnosing things over the net, so consulting a professional (e.g. a doctor) may be wise.
You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003174.htm

More discussions about physical
References in periodicals archive ?
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More recently, James Blumenthal et al, analyzed physical activity and depression.
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In the same issue, Jennifer Weuve of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and her colleagues describe long-term effects of physical activity on mental functioning in women.
The technique of modeling, in which the student tries to imitate the teacher's sound or physical gesture, may be used during a lesson to trigger simultaneous processing.
While it is reasonable to state that many PETE programs are aligned to these reforms and develop teaching candidates accordingly, many existing physical education teachers are reluctant to change and maintain instructional and programming practices that are ineffective, if not worse.
While the physical fitness program has obvious health benefits for seniors, Buchanan claims that there is another aspect of the program that improves quality of life for all participants: "Having a place for socialization is equal to the physical benefits that are being achieved here.
The self-administered questionnaire asked about women's demographic and reproductive background, as well as frequency of physical and verbal abuse in the current relationship, partner's age and the duration of the relationship.