sponge

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Related to phylum Porifera: phylum Cnidaria

sponge

 [spunj]
a porous, absorbent mass, as a pad of gauze or cotton surrounded by gauze, or the elastic fibrous skeleton of certain species of marine animals.
absorbable gelatin sponge a sterile, absorbable, water-insoluble, gelatin-base material used in the control of bleeding.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sponge

(spŭnj),
1. Absorbent material (for example, gauze, prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial sponges.
Synonym(s): spongia
[G. spongia]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sponge

(spŭnj)
n.
1. A piece of absorbent porous material, such as cellulose, plastic, or rubber, used especially for washing and cleaning.
2. A gauze pad used to absorb blood and other fluids, as in surgery or in dressing a wound.
3. A contraceptive sponge.
v.
To wash, moisten, or absorb with a sponge.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sponge

Contraceptive sponge, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sponge

(spŏnj)
1. Absorbent material (e.g., gauze or prepared cotton) used to absorb fluids.
2. A member of the phylum Porifera, the cellular endoskeleton of which is a source of commercial natural sponges.
[G. spongia ]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sponge

(spunj) [Gr. sphongos, sponge]
1. An elastic, porous mass forming the internal skeleton of certain marine animals; or a rubber or synthetic substance that resembles a sponge in properties and appearance. Synonym: spongia
2. An absorbent pad made of gauze and cotton used to absorb fluids and blood in surgery or to dress wounds.
3. Short term for sponge bath.
4. To moisten, clean, cool, or wipe with a sponge.

abdominal sponge

A flat sponge formerly used during surgery as packing to prevent closing or obstruction by intrusion of viscera, as covering to prevent tissue injury, and as absorbents.
Enlarge picture
CONTRACEPTIVE SPONGE

contraceptive sponge

A sponge impregnated with a spermicide. It is used intravaginally during sexual intercourse as a method of contraception. See: illustration
Synonym: spermicidal sponge See: contraceptive

gauze sponge

A sterile pad made of absorbent material. It is used during surgery and in wound dressing materials.

gelatin sponge

A spongy protein derived from animal collagen. It can be used to arrest local bleeding intraoperatively, to embolize blood vessels, or to form a protective coating around recently manipulated tissues.

spermicidal sponge

Contraceptive sponge.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

sponge

any member of the phylum Porifera. Sponges are multicellular organisms though many biologists regard them as colonies of single cells. Several types of cells exist in a sponge but they are functionally independent of one another and can exist on their own, or in small isolated groups. Usually they possess an internal skeleton of separate crystalline spicules, irregular organic fibres (as, for example, a bath sponge) or both.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Lagoons USX Reach Taxa NPS1 NPS2 FWS1 Phylum Porifera Phylum Cnidaria Hydridae Hydra Phylum Platyhelminthes Turbellaria Phylum Nematoda Phylum Bryozoa Plumatella unidentified bryozoans Phylum Annelida Oligochaeta Lumbricidae Lumbriculidae Tubificidae Limnodrilus Limnodrilus cervix Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri Potamothrix vejdovskyi Quistadrilus multisetosus immature w/o capil.
In addition, the data given do not support earlier notions which suggested that the phylum Porifera might be paraphyletic (Cavalier-Smith et al., 1996).
We have shown that all three classes of the phylum Porifera express molecules related to InsR; and these molecules display, in their extracellular domains, EGF-like sequences (as shown here for S.