phylogeny


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phylogeny

 [fi-loj´ĕ-ne]
the complete developmental history of a group of organisms. adj., adj phylogenet´ic, phylogen´ic.

phy·log·e·ny

(fi-loj'ĕ-nē),
The evolutionary development of species, as distinguished from ontogeny, development of the individual.
Synonym(s): phylogenesis

phylogeny

/phy·log·e·ny/ (fi-loj´ĭ-ne) the complete developmental history of a group of organisms.phylogen´ic

phylogeny

(fī-lŏj′ə-nē)
n. pl. phyloge·nies
1. The evolutionary development and history of a species or trait of a species or of a higher taxonomic grouping of organisms: the phylogeny of Calvin cycle enzymes. Also called phylogenesis.
2. A model or diagram delineating such an evolutionary history: a molecular phylogeny of the annelids.
3. A similar model or diagram delineating the development of a cultural feature.

phy′lo·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

phylogeny

[filoj′ənē]
Etymology: Gk, phylon + genesis
the development of the structure of a particular race or species as it evolved from earlier forms of life. Also called phylogenesis. Compare ontogeny. See also comparative anatomy.

phy·log·e·ny

(fī-loj'ĕ-nē)
The evolutionary development of species, as distinguished from ontogeny, development of the individual.
Synonym(s): phylogenesis.

phylogeny

The evolutionary history ending in a species.

phylogeny

the whole of the evolutionary history of a species or other taxonomic group of organisms. See Haekel's Law of RECAPITULATION.

phylogeny (fī·läˑ·j·nē),

n the evolutionary history of a species. See also ontogeny.

phylogeny

the evolutionary history of a race or group of organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phylogeny of extant nephilid orb-weaving spiders (Araneae, Nephilidae): testing morphological and ethological homologies.
The method of using retrotransposons in the construction of a molecular phylogeny allows for a relatively simple and rapid, low-cost method of determining branching order for species.
Phylogeny and divergence time estimates from the fern genus Azolla (Salviniaceae).
In a recent study, a consortium of researchers described the evolutionary relationships of representative species within major grass subfamilies (Grass Phylogeny Working Group, 2001).
A less optimal approach, but one that involves fewer assumptions about the evolutionary relationships of the taxa in question, is to assume that every branch in the phylogeny is the same length (punctuated model).
Molecular evidence often contradicts orchid flower morphology-based phylogeny (Hapeman and Inoue; and Chase and Palmer) and homoplasy abounds in the morphology of adaptive radiation (many chapters of the book).
For each phylogeny, the pair of opposing branches that experienced the most convergence to one another remained long and the length of the other pair was progressively shortened.
Phylogeny is the history of organismal lineages as they change through time.
Comparing lineages-through-time plots demonstrate that not only are similar ages recovered, but also that the previously inferred significant shift in diversification rates within the ant phylogeny is not an artifact of the "inconsistent" fossils.
The chapter also includes a "backbone" phylogeny of the Lepidoptera based on Kristensen & Skalski's (1998) tree from the Handbook of Zoology.
2006), require a consensus phylogeny before any meaningful conclusions can be drawn (Brooks & McLennan 1991, Martins 1996).
Biologists and paleontologists synthesize recent research and the current understanding of such aspects as the early ossification and development of the cranium and paired girdles of Chanos chanos, a new teleostean fish from the Early Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) off southeastern Morocco and its relationships with the ostariophysans, systematics and phylogenetic relationships of cypriniformes, the state of knowledge concerning siluriform higher-level phylogeny, and the mitochondrial phylogeny of the South American electric fish (gymnotiformes) and an alternative hypothesis for the otophysan historical biogeography.