phyllotaxy

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phyllotaxy

the arrangement of leaves on a stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
66 Stamen whorls (series when phyllotaxis is spiral; includes inner staminodes) (0) one, (1) two, (2) more than two.
In nature, alternate phyllotaxis is more common, as is shown in Fig.
Observations on phyllotaxis, stelar morphology and gemmae of Lycopodium lucidulum (Lycopodiaceae).
This angle figures extensively in the study of growth patterns of plants, known in botany as phyllotaxis, where it is found to be the most efficient angle of growth around an axis.
Besides spiral shells that disclose a geometric patterning, he refers to the "law of Phyllotaxis" that governs the development of leaves around the axis of a plant; each such instance is a "term of some series of continued fractions." Falconer refers here to the Fibonacci sequence that Goethe had treated as so important for understanding plants.
Biologists now understand the basic biochemistry that drives patterns of plant growth, called phyllotaxis, and that knowledge has fed into mathematical and computer-based models of the process.
Concepts based on a symmetrical structure were abandoned for a pattern of spirals, based on the Fibonacci series and phyllotaxis (the mathematical basis for most plant growth), which will re-appear-in the sculpture that will sit almost hidden in the core of the Core.
Pistia plants produce a rosette of leaves in a alternate spiral phyllotaxis. Vegetative reproduction in floating plants is often linked to the production of supernumerary (accessory) lateral buds i.e., several lateral buds at the one node (Lemon and Posluszny 2000).
To highlight the mathematical underpinnings of phyllotaxis, which refers to the arrangement of leaves or other botanical elements around a stem, Gole and Pau Atela, associate professor of mathematics, teamed up with Michael Marcotrigiano and Madelaine Zadik of the Smith College Botanic Garden to produce an exhibition, "Plant Spirals: Beauty You Can Count On" (www.math.smith.edu/phyllo/expo), that depicts with rare beauty and clarity the geometry and biology of plant spiral formation.
Contains reviews on organization and function of meristems, meristem formation in embryogenesis, genetic control of reproductive meristems, axillary meristem development, phyllotaxis, axial patterning, regulation of cell division, and the root meristem.
Turing's late work on Fibonacci phyllotaxis (the way in which plant structures reveal elaborate mathematical patterns) has never been fully understood by subsequent workers.