phrenologist


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phre·nol·o·gist

(frĕ-nol'ŏ-jist),
One who claims to be able to diagnose mental and behavioral characteristics by a study of the external configuration of the skull.
[see phrenology]
References in periodicals archive ?
(81) Many of the Patriot leaders were physicians, and many were also leading phrenologists. (82) Demonstrations of phrenological head reading and hypnotic trance ("animal magnetism") through lyceum lectures and debates provided visceral and highly public proofs of materialist forms of explanation of human nature.
Just outside of mainstream psychology, the phrenologists argued that each human characteristic and impulse could be located in a particular cranial organ, and that mental illness was the result of an organ, a faculty, becoming hypertrophied (overused) or atrophied (underused).
The day will also feature many examples of 19th century medical history, with costumed historians depicting medical experts of the period, including a traveling dentist and a phrenologist. In the 19th century, dentists were often itinerants, offering cleaning, filling, and extraction of teeth, as well as making dentures and selling tooth powders and brushes as they travelled from town to town.
As the camera pans this crowd, the viewer cannot help being reminded of Hogarth's Humors of an Election: The faces are a satirist's bonanza and a feast for the phrenologist.
(10) "Ill-mannered and rude," they were given to "screeching and fighting," quarrelling "like angry dogs." (11) This must have been trying for Mary Marshall, the southern cousin who had volunteered to come north to run the household and to instill in them "high moral principles." (12) Among her unusual acts was to have a phrenologist to read each youthful head in order to forecast their future; art was not among the predictions for Robert.
(83) The New Zealand newspapers, which followed the ex-celebrity phrenologist closely, noted that 'by no means deficient in ability, and gifted with persuasive powers and a facility of speech of more than a common order, he seems possessed by a mania for thieving and defrauding'.
Craig: Communitarian, Educator, Phrenologist," Vocational Aspect of Secondary and Further Education 15 (1963): 135-50.
Hall's belief that Ruth isn't "made for something" when the phrenologist tells Ruth, "Your muscular system is rather defective; there not being enough to furnish real strength and stamina of constitution" (319).
physician and phrenologist Johann Spurzheim directed his readers to
This chapter also gives us some new tools to understand Whitman after the publication of the first edition of Leaves of Grass, supplementing our cultural understanding of Whitman the Emersonian Transcendentalist, Whitman the Phrenologist, and Whitman the Temperance Advocate.
(30) However, one must also be always wary of falling into the trap that devoured the phrenologist. In the early nineteenth century, phrenologists believed that people with an extreme trait would have an overly developed portion of the brain devoted to that function, creating a protrusion on the skull.
But perhaps more intriguingly there was to be a demonstration by a phrenologist called Anne Marchant.