phrenic nerve


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Related to phrenic nerve: vagus nerve

phrenic

 [fren´ik]
1. pertaining to the diaphragm or to the mind.
3. mental (def. 1).
phrenic nerve a major branch of the cervical plexus, extending through the thorax to provide innervation of the diaphragm. Nerve impulses from the inspiratory center in the brain travel down it, causing contraction of the diaphragm, so that inhalation can occur.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

phren·ic nerve

[TA]
arises from the cervical plexus, chiefly conveying fibers from the fourth cervical nerve, passes downward in front of the anterior scalene muscle and enters the thorax between the subclavian artery and vein behind the sternoclavicular articulation; it then passes in front of the root of the lung to the diaphragm; it is mainly the motor nerve of the diaphragm but sends sensory fibers to the mediastinal parietal pleura, the pericardium, the diaphragmatic pleura and peritoneum, and branches (phrenicoabdominales branches) that communicate with branches from the celiac plexus.
Synonym(s): nervus phrenicus [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

phren·ic nerve

(fren'ik nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the cervical plexus, chiefly from the fourth cervical nerve; passes downward in front of the anterior scalene muscle and enters the thorax between the subclavian artery and vein behind the sternoclavicular articulation; it then passes in front of the root of the lung to the diaphragm; it is mainly the motor nerve of the diaphragm but sends sensory fibers to the mediastinal parietal pleura, the pericardium, the diaphragmatic pleura and peritoneum, and branches (phrenicoabdominal branches) that communicate with branches from the celiac plexus.
Synonym(s): nervus phrenicus [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The mechanism of the occurrence of PNI is probably related to positioning the balloon further into the right pulmonary veins, as the phrenic nerve may run behind the right atrium.
The neurologic deficit caused by the cranial positioning of the right diaphragm due to the injuryofthe phrenic nerve, as well as from the spinal accessory nerve injury, reduced this patient's quality of life.
In one male specimen, both sides of the nerve to the subclavius were merged with the phrenic nerve (Fig.
Potential mechanisms include abnormal diaphragmatic innervation secondary to early interruption of neuronal migration; direct, viral-mediated phrenic nerve or spinal cord injury; or, less likely, a demyelinating neuropathy or other immune-mediated process.
In our patient, the tumor was attached to the supraclavicular fossa and adherent to the scalene muscles, expanding nearby to involve vital anatomic structures, such as the internal jugular vein and accessory and phrenic nerves. Nonetheless, the tumor could be excised en bloc and all vital structures were preserved.
Table 1: Indications for thoracostomy in groups Injury Trochar ICD Blunt ICD n=25 (%) Cn=25 (%) Hemothorax 14 (56) 13 (52) Pneumothorax 9 (26) 10 (40) Tension 2 (8) 1 (4) pneumothorax Flail chest 4 (16) 5 (20) Table 2: Complications Complications Trochar thoracostomy Blunt thoracostom n=25(%) y (n=25) Vascular injury 1 (6.66) 0 Diaphragm injury 1 (6.66) 0 Splenic injury 1 (6.66) 0 Liver injury 0 0 Bowel injury 1 (6.66) 0 Bronchopleural 1 (6.66) 0 fistula Heart injury 0 0 Subcutaneous 3 (20) 0 placement Intraparenchymal 1 (6.66) 0 placement Re-expansion 0 0 pulmonary edema Phrenic nerve 0 0 injury Esophageal 0 0 perforation Chylothorax 0 0 Cardiac 0 0 dysrhythmias Infectious 2 (13.33) 2 (13.33) complications
Phrenic nerve injury is one of the frequent causes, especially at delivery, followed by neoplastic infiltration, compressions, or surgical interventions [4, 17, 18].
There was a significantly higher incidence of phrenic nerve injury with cryoablation; however, most of these injuries resolved at 12 months.
Some authors include the fifth cervical nerve to the plexus which contributes to the formation of one of the motor branches of the cervical plexus called the phrenic nerve. Therefore, the cervical plexus can also be defined as a network of nerves formed by the ventral rami of C1-C5 nerves and gives off both motor and sensory branches [12].
These body parts include the heart, lungs, diaphragm, phrenic nerve, esophagus, ribs, intercostal muscles, blood vessels, and skin.
Other possible complications from a brachial plexus chemical neurolysis include pneumothorax, ipsilateral Horner's syndrome, phrenic nerve damage, intravenous or intraarterial injection, neuraxial injection, and quadriplegia.