phrenic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phrenic

 [fren´ik]
1. pertaining to the diaphragm or to the mind.
3. mental (def. 1).
phrenic nerve a major branch of the cervical plexus, extending through the thorax to provide innervation of the diaphragm. Nerve impulses from the inspiratory center in the brain travel down it, causing contraction of the diaphragm, so that inhalation can occur.

phren·ic

(fren'ik),
1. Synonym(s): diaphragmatic
2. Relating to the mind.

phrenic

(frĕn′ĭk, frē′nĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the mind.
2. Anatomy Of or relating to the diaphragm: the phrenic nerve.

phren·ic

(fren'ik)
1. Synonym(s): diaphragmatic.
2. Relating to the mind.

phrenic

Pertaining to the mind or to the DIAPHRAGM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sacrifice of the phrenic nerve necessitated a postoperative consultation with a physiotherapist for breathing assistance.
Samples of muscle tissue, 1 mm in width, were collected from the vicinity of phrenic nerve distal branching where axons ending and end-plate regions are more profusely concentrated.
In the present study, we found a case that was connected with phrenic nerve, and rest of them were isolated independently.
Given the satisfactory ultrasound imaging of the brachial plexus and the possible benefit of a more distal location from the phrenic nerve, we used the paracoracoid approach for this case.
Although extremely rare, spinal cord compression due to cervical spine anomalies should be kept in the differential diagnosis of a baby presenting with encephalopathy, as it can cause phrenic nerve palsy resulting in respiratory failure and neurological sequelae.
Parke and Whalen described two patients with severe cervical myelopathy who developed respiratory insufficiency related to phrenic nerve palsy after cervical manipulation [2].
The diaphragm presented thickness with muscle fibers, which suggested a normal embryonic development and later perinatal traumatic injury of the phrenic nerve.
There was a significantly higher incidence of phrenic nerve injury with cryoablation; however, most of these injuries resolved at 12 months.
For example, in laser-captured phrenic motoneurons [70], mRNA for 5-[HT.sub.2A] receptors was upregulated 14 days after cervical hemisection, but had returned to normal or below at 21 days.
The complications were classified as in-hospital death, non-lethal complications and phrenic nerve palsy (which mainly occurred in cryoballoon ablation).
To investigate the potential impact of topiramate on muscle contraction, phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations were used as a neuromuscular junction model.
The extrahepatic collaterals (i.e., the internal thoracic artery, the right inferior phrenic artery, and the omental artery) supplying the hepatic cystic lesions were also embolized using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles (300–500-[micro]m; PVA foam embolization particles, PVA, Cook Incorporated, Bloomington, IN, USA), if necessary.