photosynthesis

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photosynthesis

 [fo″to-sin´thĕ-sis]
a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light. adj., adj photosynthet´ic.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis),
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

/pho·to·syn·the·sis/ (fo″to-sin´thĭ-sis) a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically, the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxoide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light.photosynthet´ic

photosynthesis

(fō′tō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs)
n.
The process in green plants and certain other organisms by which carbohydrates are synthesized from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (usually water), using light as an energy source. Most forms of photosynthesis release oxygen as a byproduct.

pho′to·syn·thet′ic (-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
pho′to·syn·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

photosynthesis

[fōtōsin′thəsis]
Etymology: Gk, phos + synthesis, putting together
a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria containing chlorophyll synthesize organic compounds, chiefly carbohydrates, from atmospheric carbon dioxide and water, using light for energy and liberating oxygen in the process. photosynthetic, adj.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis)
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide and water into organic chemicals using the energy of light, with the release of oxygen. Photosynthesis occurs in green plants which are known as AUTOTROPHS. CYANOBACTERIA also carry out photosynthesis. See LIGHT REACTIONS and CALVIN CYCLE.

photosynthesis (fōˈ·tō·sinˑ·th·sis),

n metabolic process by which plants and some bacteria use carbon dioxide and sunlight to produce glucose. Oxygen is a by product of this process.

photosynthesis

a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
The application's normal bivariate simulation, which considers the temperature and photosynthetically active radiation, was tested, and the results were superior to other simulations by Martin et al.
Although both the wavelength and orientation of typical laser illumination differ from that of natural illumination, a study [43] indicates that lidar can accurately estimate the rate of photosynthetically active radiation absorption and define the location and depth of the zone where the maximum rate of absorption occurs [44].
Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was altered concurrently with temperature, with the highest PAR value (900-1,000 [micro]mol/[m.
6] joule of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR).
In general, a filamentous (or a cushion-shaped) morphology is more efficient than a bushy one to capture photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) light (Littler et al.
The attenuation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was calculated and used together with hydrographic measurements to show that the phytoplanktons in the investigated areas of the Southern Ocean are not light limited.
During the first 4 weeks, the daytime photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), air temperature, and relative humidity (RH) were set at 600 Watts [m.
Petioles borne in an upright or horizontal position, interpreted as fronds that were still photosynthetically active when buffed, are confined to the uppermost preserved part of the tree.
Further, photosynthetically active cells require more Cu than other cells.
It is well known that photosynthetically macrophyte-generated oxygen has an important role in the biodegradation of organic matter of wastewater by aerobic and facultative bacteria (Saha and Jana, 2003).
After 2000, the dominant aquatic macrophytes were emergent species, which would also release most of the photosynthetically produced oxygen directly into the atmosphere.