photosynthesis


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photosynthesis

 [fo″to-sin´thĕ-sis]
a chemical combination caused by the action of light; specifically the formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the chlorophyll tissue of plants under the influence of light. adj., adj photosynthet´ic.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis),
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

(fō′tō-sĭn′thĭ-sĭs)
n.
The process in green plants and certain other organisms by which carbohydrates are synthesized from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (usually water), using light as an energy source. Most forms of photosynthesis release oxygen as a byproduct.

pho′to·syn·thet′ic (-sĭn-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
pho′to·syn·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

pho·to·syn·the·sis

(fō'tō-sin'thĕ-sis)
1. The compounding or building up of chemical substances under the influence of light.
2. The process by which green plants, using chlorophyll and the energy of sunlight, produce carbohydrates from water and carbon dioxide, liberating molecular oxygen in the process.
[photo- + G. synthesis, a putting together]

photosynthesis

the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide and water into organic chemicals using the energy of light, with the release of oxygen. Photosynthesis occurs in green plants which are known as AUTOTROPHS. CYANOBACTERIA also carry out photosynthesis. See LIGHT REACTIONS and CALVIN CYCLE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydric stress affects plant development by reducing photosynthesis rates (through the restriction of C[O.sub.2] diffusion to the leaf mesophyll) and by limiting the chloroplast C[O.sub.2] fixation capacity.
The diurnal photosynthesis rates of Moso bamboo in summer and autumn fell in a single hump curve.
But advances in nanotechnology, a field in which the Berkeley lab excels, make the development of artificial photosynthesis far more realistic.
Some bacteria instead perform 'anoxygenic' photosynthesis, a version that uses molecules other than water to power the process and does not release oxygen.
"Under the traditional view -- that anoxygenic photosynthesis evolved first and was the only type for about a billion years or more before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved -- these structures should not exist at all in this type of bacteria."
"We expected the two would correlate since CO2 stimulates photosynthesis, but given the complexity of plant and environmental interactions we were impressed by how closely they have kept pace," Cernusak said.
Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities (energy transformation).
As the method was emission-free but could not be leveraged in the same way, scientists started working on artificial photosynthesis. These techniques, which have been around for decades, can work, but cannot be scaled to an industrial level at the moment.
Optimization of CO[sub.2]-controlled stomatal closing could lead to development of plant varieties for water-scarce environments that lose substantially less water per carbon fixed by photosynthesis. Our research has identified two enzymes, β-carbonic anhydrases βCA1 and βCA4, which, when overexpressed in guard cells in Arabidopsis thaliana, enhance CO[sub.2]-regulation of stomatal closing while maintaining functional drought and light responses.
The researchers improved the plant's water use efficiency--the ratio of carbon dioxide entering the plant to that of escaping water--by 25% without significantly sacrificing photosynthesis or yield in real-world field trials.
Ingenhousz' s research also indicated that photosynthesis only occurs in the green portions of plants, in areas with chlorophyll that allow the plant to utilize energy from the sun.
For scientists who want to unravel the ocean's complexities, however, "measuring photosynthesis and respiration in the ocean has been notoriously difficult," said Benjamin Van Mooy, a marine chemist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.