photosynthate

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photosynthate

(fō′tō-sĭn′thāt)
n.
A chemical product of photosynthesis.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the transfer of photosynthates into xylem rays is to be expected, and from rays, flow of solutes into axial parenchyma can occur (Holt, 1975).
Fixed photosynthates now are accumulated in the fruit as it ripens.
One explanation is that increased light with sufficient water content led to photosynthates accumulation and quick growth of the bamboo ramets (Wang et al.
Girdling consists of removal of a strip of bark from the trunk or major limbs of a fruit tree, thereby blocking the downward translocation of photosynthates and metabolites through the phloem.
This enhancement in biological yield is due to the role of potassium in translocation of photosynthates from higher concentration to low concentration (Romheld and Kirkby, 2010).
Total dry matter reflects the gain of mass, i.e., the accumulation of photosynthates from the photosynthetic process of the plant as a whole.
Further increase may lead to remobilization of stored sucrose for growth and maintenance of cellular process, due to the reduced amount of photosynthate production after maturity, indicating decrease in the sucrose content in the matured tissues during 13 MAP.
Given the mounting evidence that materials can move from host to parasite and among multiple parasitized hosts, it is possible that dodder might act as a conduit for other biologically important molecules such as photosynthates and mineral nutrients.
Such trees would use less water and be less susceptible to water stress, thereby improving fruit water status and fruit growth rate during Stage III (final swell) when the fruit have a large demand for photosynthates and water [13, 35-37].
Leguminous plants and rhizobia maintain a symbiotic relationship, where the rhizobium cannot bring about nodulation and nitrogen fixation without a supply of photosynthates from the host plants.