photoreceptor cells

pho·to·re·cep·tor cells

rod and cone cells of the retina.

pho·to·re·cep·tor cells

(fō'tō-rĕ-sep'tŏr selz)
Rod and cone cells of the retina.
References in periodicals archive ?
Retinitis pigmentosa -- the most common cause of blindness in young people -- occurs mostly due to loss of millions of light sensitive photoreceptor cells that line the retina, Medical Xpress reported.
Here it activates certain photoreceptor cells called cones and rods.
Light detection is believed to occur in sea urchins within photoreceptor cells in the terminal disc region of their motile tube feet, within spines, and across the test (Millot, 1954; Ullrich-Lifter et al., 2011).
Photoreceptor cells in the retina sense light, signaling the brain, but only in the presence of retinal molecules within the cells.
Biochemist Prof Gang Han, of the University of Massachusetts, explained: "When light enters the eye and hits the retina, the rods and cones - or photoreceptor cells - absorb the photons with visible light wavelengths and send corresponding electric signals to the brain.
Photoreceptor degeneration is an important pathological process in degenerative retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.[1],[2] Intense ultraviolet and blue light initiate photoreceptor damage and death.[3],[4],[5] In animal models of light-induced retinal degeneration, the death of the photoreceptor cells is predominantly caused by apoptosis.[6],[7],[8] Inflammatory chemokines are also increased and microglia are activated in the light-stressed retina,[9],[10] and anti-inflammatory measures have been shown to reduce photoreceptor degeneration in the retina.[11],[12]
These conditions lead to slow degeneration of photoreceptor cells in the retina of human eyes, leading to gradual loss of sight.
For some time, we have been working to transplant photoreceptor cells into the retina in the laboratory.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with a progressive loss of photoreceptor cells at the point of sharpest vision.
Although traditional AOSLO allows researchers to visualize individual photoreceptor cells, such systems are as large as a billiard table, costly and extremely complex.
But neurons are not particularly good at regenerating, and that includes light-sensitive photoreceptor cells.
Macular degeneration, an incurable eye disease that results in significant vision loss starting on average in a person in his 50s or 60s, is the death of photoreceptor cells in the retina.