photoreaction


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pho·to·re·ac·tion

(fō'tō-rē-ak'shŭn),
A reaction caused or affected by light; for example, a photochemical reaction, photolysis, photosynthesis, phototropism, thymine dimer formation.

photoreaction

[-rē·ak′shən]
Etymology: Gk, phos + L, re, again, agere, to act
any chemical reaction that is stimulated by the influence of light.

pho·to·re·ac·tion

(fō'tō-rē-ak'shŭn)
A reaction caused or affected by light, e.g., a photochemical reaction, photolysis, photosynthesis, phototropism, thymine dimer formation.

photoreaction

(fō″tō-rē-ăk′shŭn) [″ + LL. reactus, reacted]
A chemical reaction produced or influenced by light.
References in periodicals archive ?
The photoreaction yields two transient species, an alkoxy radical and an aromatic radical cation.
The bacterium Escherichia coli harbors an enzyme called DNA photolyase, which reverses the photoreaction between two thymines.
This observation matches the previous study (23), (25), (32), (33) was indicated that PQ molecules induce a variation in polarizability during the photoreaction process.
Since the carbon-phosphorous bond was broken during the Norrish Type I photoreaction of these compounds, there was no interaction between the carbonyl and phosphonyl groups in these photoproducts.
Photocatalysis is the acceleration of a photoreaction in the presence of a catalyst and provides a way to harness solar energy for useful chemical work.
We also chemically analyzed the products of the laser-induced photoreaction using a microscopic UV-Vis spectrophotometer, a microscopic FT-IR, mass spectrometry, GPO and NMR.
The chain growth of conjugated polyene sequences in PVC is a well-studied photoreaction whose depth dependence is controlled by the subsurface availability of oxygen.
Ford, Flash Photolysis of Ru3(CO)i2: Evidence for Intermediates in the Competing Fragmentation and Ligand-Substitution Photoreactions, J.
In regions having abundant nanoparticles, and if these particles catalyze the photoreactions, the degradation rate would be higher, resulting in deeper and larger holes.
Their topics include templating photoreactions in solutions, supramolecular photochirogenesis, the photochromism of multicomponent diarylethene crystals, controlling photoreactions through non-covalent interactions within zeolite nanocages, and protein-controlled ultrafast photoisomerization in rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin.
According to lead researcher Neil Branda, "photoswitches" - light-sensitive materials that undergo photoreactions - have been available for years.
Through the use of such ionic chiral auxiliaries, Scheffer has shown that near-quantitative asymmetric induction is possible in a wide variety of organic photoreactions.