photoreaction


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pho·to·re·ac·tion

(fō'tō-rē-ak'shŭn),
A reaction caused or affected by light; for example, a photochemical reaction, photolysis, photosynthesis, phototropism, thymine dimer formation.

pho·to·re·ac·tion

(fō'tō-rē-ak'shŭn)
A reaction caused or affected by light, e.g., a photochemical reaction, photolysis, photosynthesis, phototropism, thymine dimer formation.

photoreaction

(fō″tō-rē-ăk′shŭn) [″ + LL. reactus, reacted]
A chemical reaction produced or influenced by light.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Previous studies have yielded unconvincing and contradictory results, because the light stimulus always triggered a series of processes, making it difficult to distinguish the primary photoreaction from the subsequent steps," says Dube.
Caption: Figure 4: X ray diffraction of Mg/Al hydrotalcites with different Mg/Al ratios activated at 500[degrees]C before photoreaction.
This condition of photoreaction was also sufficient to inactivate baculovirus in an indirect virus detection assay in which Sf9 cells were infected with UVDEX treated or nontreated baculovirus (data not shown).
A photocatalyst accelerates a photoreaction in the presence of a catalyst.
Taking into account the linear relationship between the substrate concentration and the absorbance (Abs), which is described by the Lambert-Beer law, the resulting expression is (given by Equation 7; therefore, the obtained constants rate were taken from the initial photoreaction region (up to 10 hours) in all cases.
The adsorption at different values of the initial concentration of the catalyst showed that for high concentrations of Ti[O.sub.2] the adsorption is unfavorable due to the agglomeration phenomena and this cause a reduction of specific surface available to the activation in a photoreaction (Bekkouche, et al, 2004).
TABLE 1: Identification of the small molecular intermediates of aniline during the photoreaction by GC/MS.
It is considered an important step towards the production of a photoreaction with the ability to convert carbon dioxide and atmospheric methane to chemicals at industrial scale.
Photoreaction measurement was estimated by monitoring the intensity changes of the cinnamate absorption at maximal value.