photopigment


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photopigment

a pigment molecule that can be excited by light, such as CHLOROPHYLL.

photopigment 

Any pigment, such as the visual pigment found in the photoreceptors of the retina, which is altered by the absorption of light energy. See visual pigment; rhodopsin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Color Vision: From Genes to Perception, chapter Opsin genes, cone photopigments, color vision, and color blindness, pages 3-51.
However, he adds, even as activating melanopsin photopigment during the day is believed to be beneficial, it could be bad to activate it at night.
Phytoplankton photopigments as indicators of estuarine and coastal eutrophication.
770 [cm.sup.2]) represents a substantial substrate on which to incorporate photopigment molecules.
(1993) were fitted to the normalized spectral sensitivity data assuming the presence of two visual photopigments. Unknown model parameters (photopigment absorption maxima and their weighting proportions) were estimated by using maximum likelihood within the software package R (vers.
While in their judgment the transplanted cells appear to be alive and contain the photopigment required for vision, they say it remains to be seen whether these cells link up with neurons in the other layers of the retina.
Unlike other vertebrates, they have several genes for the light-sensitive photopigment rhodopsin, which likely enables these fish to detect bioluminescent signals from light-emitting organs.
They noted that, in eyes after macular hole surgery, the Rayleigh equations were shifted toward a protanomalous setting compared to fellow eyes and concluded that recovery of the visual acuity may precede that of the optical density in cone photopigment of central retina.
At some point one such cilium may have gained opsin photopigment expression and light sensitivity, followed by invagination of the apical surface into a sensory cavity where increasingly folded whorls of ciliary lamellae could be stacked, producing a rudimentary ocellus akin to the Protula unpigmented ocellus.
Therefore, it is most likely that a functional circadian photopigment is present in these embryonic cells associated with the adjustment of the clock molecular machinery to light conditions.
Its affects are two folds, one disordering of photoreceptors and two slowing of photopigment regeneration.
The compound only works when the rods and cones of the retinal photopigment layer have already died, as this causes electrophysiological changes in to the ganglion cells.