photophore


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pho·to·phore

(fō'tō-fōr),
In bacteriology, the organ producing intracellular bioluminescence in certain organisms.
[photo- + G. phoros, bearing]

photophore

a light-emitting organ. These occur particularly in deep-sea cephalopods and crustaceans and are normally directed vertically, so disguising the animal's outline from below.
References in periodicals archive ?
The intestinal photophore was visible only in some individuals because most specimens were in poor condition.
Hyaloteuthis, Eucleoteuthis and Ommastrephes are relatively rare in the ETP (all the molecularly identified ommastrephids in this study were Sthenoteuthis or Dosidicus; see also Yatsu (3)), and only 9 specimens were tentatively identified as Eucleoteuthis and 2 specimens were tentatively identified as Ommastrephes by proboscis suckers and photophores (6 others were excluded from Dosidicus or Sthenoteuthis but were too small to be assignable to the other 3 genera).
Claes said that there are two spines, one in front of each dorsal fin, and just behind them they have two rows of photophores, which are like lightsabers - they illuminate the spine.
Tentacles, sparkling photophores, bacteria-powered lures that protrude from the forehead and mimic a yummy morsel: they light up when the creature needs to hunt or hide or mate.
The chemical reaction takes place in organs called photophores near the hatchetfish's belly.
cholerae, in the extracellular epithelial crypts of 2 light organs called photophores, which branch out over the underside of the squid.
The photophores have a definite pattern and are apparently used for social and sexual signaling.
But (3,281 to 13,123 ft) many creatures are bioluminescent (body produces light through photophores, light- producing organs).
Like the majority of deep-sea species, most anglerfish can flash or glow an eerie blue or red light using gland-like organs called photophores embedded beneath the skin.