photon


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photon

 [fo´ton]
a discrete particle (quantum) of radiant energy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pho·ton (hν, γ),

(fō'ton),
In physics, a corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

photon

(fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
physics A corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

photon

a quantum of radiant energy with a wavelength in the visible range of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Photon

A light particle.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

photon 

The basic unit of radiant energy defined by the equation
E = hν
where h is Planck's constant (6.62 ✕ 10−34 joule ✕ second), ν the frequency of the light and E the energy difference carried away by the emission of a single photon of light. The term photon usually refers to visible light whereas the term quantum refers to other electromagnetic radiations. See quantum theory; wave theory; troland.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

pho·ton

(γ) (fō'ton)
In physics, corpuscle of energy or particle of light; a quantum of light or other electromagnetic radiation.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the latest commercial offerings in the single photon counting market is Excelitas' single-photon counting modules (SPCMs) from Pacer.
"Without having a source of coherent single photons, you can't use any of these quantum effects that are the foundation of optical quantum information manipulation," says Bawendi, who is the Lester Wolfe Professor of Chemistry.
Transferring data using light passed along fibre optic cables has become increasingly common over the past decades, but each pulse currently contains millions of photons. That means that, in principle, a portion of these could be intercepted without detection.
Theoretical and computational aspects of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production such as involved leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) subprocesses, direct and fragmentation component of the cross section, and photon isolation requirement have been discussed in many papers (e.g., see [30, 32]).
The scientists injected photons one at a time into an interferometer.
The purpose of the paper is to present a model view of the photon by obtaining a three-dimensional solution from Eqs.
With regard to this issue, we developed a photon detection system that has high quantum efficiency (988%) and is able to discriminate the number of incident photons.
Of course, the cumulative effect of absorbing lots of cell tower photons would be to raise the temperature of your cells.
"The new website is a true representation of Photon, always ON and responsive" said Mukund Balasubramanian, CTO of Photon Infotech.
Oscillating photons aren't a new idea, ALPs are just the current flavor in favor.
(4) Time-bin coding optical transmissions: An encoding method for quantum states using single photons. Measures the difference in a single photon's phase (timing) with an optical interferometer.