photoluminescence


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Related to photoluminescence: fluorescence, electroluminescence

photoluminescence

/pho·to·lu·min·es·cence/ (-loo″min-es´ins) the quality of being luminescent after exposure to light or other electromagnetic radiation.

photoluminescence

(fō″tō-lū-mĭ-nĕs′ĕns) [″ + L. lumen, light]
The power of an object to become luminescent when acted on by light.

luminescence

Emission of light by certain substances resulting from the absorption of energy (e.g. from electrical fields, chemical reaction, or other light), which is not due to a rise in temperature (unlike incandescence). The emitted radiation is characteristic of the particular substance. When the light emitted is due to exposure to a source of light the process is usually called photoluminescence. When the light emitted is due to either a high-frequency discharge through a gas, or to an electric field through certain solids such as phosphor which is used in fluorescent lamps, television picture tubes, etc., it is called electroluminescence. See bioluminescence; fluorescence; incandescence; fluorescent lamp; phosphorescence.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has extensively been used to study the optical possessions of Silisyum.
Salman Ogli pointed to the choice of infrared wavelength for imaging, which intensifies photoluminescence power of the nanoparticles substantially, as a significant result of the research.
Senthilkumaar, S, Selvi, RT, "Formation and Photoluminescence of Zinc Sulfide Nanorods.
Infrared photoluminescence imaging of infrared materials: HgCdTe/Cd(Zn)Te heterostructures, Infrared Physics & Technology, 46, 181-184.
Mielenz, "Photoluminescence Spectrometry" in Optical Radiation Measurements, Volume 3, Measurement of Photoluminescence, ed.
Body fluid visualization, fibre analysis, and document examination have all seen improvements with the use of photoluminescence.
A century-old device used to demonstrate sparking has helped shed new light on the mechanism of photoluminescence in porous silicon.
Raman Filtering, UV Edge Rejection Photoluminescence Radiometry (LED, light source characterization) Tunable High Purity Light Source Detector Characterization
These particles are from 1 to 3 nm, and show photoluminescence emission up to 43%.
The topics include the future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique, modifying the surface and interface of silicate glass using supercritical water, studying the fiber structure and elastic properties of silica glass with molecular dynamics simulations, glass-ceramics from kinescope glass cullet, tellurium oxide thin film waveguides for integrated photonics, and the effects of reducing agent on the photoluminescence properties of alkali borosilicate phase-separated glasses doped with copper ion.
For discovery of photoluminescence in porous silicon