photoinactivation

pho·to·in·ac·ti·va·tion

(fō'tō-in-ak'ti-vā'shŭn),
Inactivation by light; for example, as in the treatment of herpes simplex by local application of a photoactive dye followed by exposure to a fluorescent lamp.

pho·to·in·ac·ti·va·tion

(fō'tō-in-ak'ti-vā'shŭn)
1. Acute sensitivity to light.
2. Inactivation by light (e.g., as in the treatment of herpes simplex by local application of a photoactive dye followed by exposure to a fluorescent lamp).
References in periodicals archive ?
and consists a reversible regulatory and protective mechanism that involves changes in the thylakoid membranes triggered by transthylakoidal pH gradient, transition states and photoinactivation of PSII (Rohacek, Soukupova, & Bartak, 2008).
2] treatment can be explained by the direct action of photoinactivation and Haber-Weiss reactions leading to internal cell injuries.
The discussion was based on a number of recent studies of the interaction of ultraviolet and visible lasers with the biological systems, as well as to illustrate every possible mechanism expected in the photoinactivation process.
Photoinactivation of Catalase Occurs under Both High and low-temperature stress conditions and accompanies photo inhibition of photosystem II.
Ultraviolet (193, 216 and 254 nm) photoinactivation of Escherichia coli strains with different repair deficiencies.
Diurnal changes in the photochemical efficiency of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (Dinophycea) of corals: photoprotection, photoinactivation and the relationship to coral bleaching.
It is also reported that decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence under drought stress seems to indicate the occurrence of chronic photoinhibition due to photoinactivation of photosystem II centers, possibly attributable to D1 protein damage which usually limit photosynthetic activity (Zlatev, 2004).
An alternative explanation for the low levels of antioxidant activity observed could be enzyme photoinactivation.