photography

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photography

See Photodocumentation.

photography,

n the process of making images on a chemically sensitive plate or film, using the energy of light or other radiant source.
References in periodicals archive ?
When photographing in fog, it is a good idea to put some color in the foreground, since fog will silence colors in the background and create something of an overall monotone.
About the same time she began photographing these subjects the magazines she freelanced for began publishing the works of ``new journalists'' Tom Wolfe, Norman Mailer and Hunter S.
There are four "century of photography" books that were to come out at the end of 1999 and very few mention the photographers that are in my book, like Eugene Eubanks who photographed the Black Panther party and Earnest Withers who was really significant in photographing in Memphis.
My approach to photographing dance onstage changed forever in 1965, after I witnessed Life magazine's Gjon Mili photographing dancers in the ABT production of Harald Lander's La Sylphide onstage at the New York State Theater.
The live shoot, sponsored by Olympus, will cover all aspects of photographing clothing, accessories and beauty on the fast-paced fashion catwalk.
Rokach encourages his students to overcome their shyness about photographing strangers in strange places.
Recently, Gursky has been photographing stockholders' meetings, the annual conferences where corporate shareholders gather to vote on policy.
That stance is emblematized in the 1939 painting Myself Among the Churchgoers, in which Shahn depicts himself photographing at the left edge of the image, as if walking away from the center of action, but training his camera with its sly viewfinder on the looming clump of dour citizens at the right, implicating the viewer just this side of the frame.
If I stage things too much and nothing changes in the act of photographing, then I might as well have not taken the picture: If the whole thing already exists in my head, then I haven't learned anything.
Over the past several years she has produced a seemingly endless stream of close-up self-portraits, made by photographing her face, naked body, or torso--always reflected in a mirror--and then copying the images onto canvas in an aggressively expressionist style.
By photographing "sculptures" that exist outside galleries, Hernandez ultimately implies that our ideas about art belong to the larger aesthetic terrain of the everyday.
New York, to start with, that predominant though not exclusive site of Arbus's photographing.