photocoagulation


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Related to photocoagulation: Panretinal Photocoagulation

photocoagulation

 [fo″to-ko-ag″u-la´shun]
condensation of protein material by the controlled use of an intense beam of light (e.g., argon laser); used especially in the treatment of retinal detachment and destruction of abnormal retinal vessels or intraocular tumor masses.

pho·to·co·ag·u·la·tion

(fō'tō-kō-ag'yū-lā'shŭn),
A method by which a beam of electromagnetic energy is directed to a desired tissue under visual control; localized coagulation results from absorption of light energy and its conversion to heat or conversion of tissue to plasma (atoms stripped of electrons).
[photo- + L. coagulo, pp. -atus, to curdle]

photocoagulation

(fō′tō-kō-ăg′yə-lā′shən)
n.
Surgical coagulation of tissue by means of intense light energy, such as a laser beam, performed to destroy abnormal tissues or to form adhesive scars, especially in ophthalmology.

pho′to·co·ag′u·late v.

photocoagulation

Ophthalmology The use of argon, or less commonly, xenon, lasers to focally burn the retina to ↓ neovascularization, microaneurysms, macular edema in Pts with various retinopathies Outcomes 50% ↓ in severe visual loss, compared to nontreated eyes. See Diabetic retinopathy. Cf Vitrectomy.

pho·to·co·ag·u·la·tion

(fō'tō-kō-ag'yū-lā'shŭn)
A method by which a beam of electromagnetic energy is directed to a desired tissue under visual control; localized coagulation results from absorption of light energy and its conversion to heat or conversion of tissue to plasma (atoms stripped of electrons).
[photo- + L. coagulo, pp. -atus, to curdle]

photocoagulation

Destruction of tissue by the heating effect of intense focused white light or by the use of a laser. It is widely used by ophthalmic surgeons to treat disorders of the RETINA, especially DIABETIC RETINOPATHY and areas of retinal degeneration that threaten to lead to retinal detachment.

Photocoagulation

Cancer treatment in which the tumor is destroyed by an intense beam of laser light.
Mentioned in: Retinoblastoma

photocoagulation 

Process of changing blood and tissue from a fluid to a clotted state produced by the heat of an intense beam of light (e.g. laser), as used in the treatment or prophylactic treatment of retinal diseases (e.g. diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachments, retinal breaks, haemorrhages). See laser; age-related macular degeneration; retinal break; retinal detachment; diabetic retinopathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Laser Photocoagulation was meted out with a 523 um argon laser for obliteration of the tumour's vascular supply, along with adjuvant cryotherapy in selected cases.
Macular grid laser photocoagulation for branch retinal vein occlusion.
FA clearly indicated leakage, diagnosed presence of new vessels and localized the site for photocoagulation.
Manual measurement of subfoveal choroidal thickness, heterogeneous groups of patients with and without previous panretinal photocoagulation, and the variable timing of previous anti-VEGF injections were the limitations of our study.
Subretinal neovascularization complicating laser photocoagulation of diabetic maculopathy.
Current treatment option includes corticosteroids, laser photocoagulation, retinal cryotherapy and surgical management in form of Pars Plana Vitrectomy (PPV) for VH or TRD.
While those CRVO patients who had vision of 6/36 or better, associated vasculopathies, vitreous haemorrhage, retinal neovascularization and previous laser photocoagulation were excluded from the study.
From each case, the following information were collected: (1) demographic features, including age, gender, and race; (2) general information of T2D progression and management, such as date of T2D diagnosis, 5-year HbA1c levels (including the lowest, median, and highest values), and medications for T2D (including metformin, insulin, and other hypoglycemic agents); (3) grading of DR and prior DR treatments such as laser photocoagulation and intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents; and (4) ophthalmic history such as retinal vein occlusion and age-related macular degeneration.
Focal PC is delivered with very low energy compared with panretinal photocoagulation (PRP); nevertheless, some enlargement of laser scarring may lead to the atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor cells.
The area where laser photocoagulation was performed becomes atrophic, eventually restricting the patient's peripheral visual field.
Key words: Diabetes mellitus; Macular edema; Laser photocoagulation; Vitrectomy
The treatment of choice has been laser photocoagulation and/or cryotherapy in early stages.