photocarcinogenesis

photocarcinogenesis

(fō-tō-căr-sĭn-ō-jĕn′ĕ-sĭs)
Malignant skin damage caused by exposure to ultraviolet rays.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oxidative stress has a major effect in the process of photoaging and photocarcinogenesis and also in the pathogenesis of photodermatosis.
The acute harmful effects of ultraviolet rays on the skin include damage to DNA, apoptosis, erythema, immunosuppression and an increase in pigmentation due to stimulation of melanogenesis, while the long-term effects include photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Epidemiological studies have reported an increasing prevalence of cutaneous malignancies, which has been attributed to factors like large quantities of UV radiation entering the atmosphere due to the thinning of the ozone layer, living and travelling in sunny climates, excessive sunbathing and sun bed use, outdoor sports, and the usage of appliances and devices that emit UV radiation in domestic and industrial settings.1
Protective effect of topically applied olive oil against photocarcinogenesis following UVB exposure of mice.
Photochemoprevention of ultraviolet B signaling and photocarcinogenesis. Mutat Res 2005; 571: 153-173, doi: 10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2004.07.019.
Ohtsuki, "Role of matrix metalloproteinases in photoaging and photocarcinogenesis," International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol.
Huang et al., "Irradiance-dependent UVB photocarcinogenesis," Scientific Reports, vol.
Ohtsuki, "Role of matrix metalloproteinases in photo-aging and photocarcinogenesis," International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol.
In the case of AK, transformation into squamous cell carcinoma follows the 3 stages of photocarcinogenesis: initiation, that is, UV-light exposure, promotion (clonal expansion of metaplastic cells), and conversion through further genetic mutations into squamous cell carcinoma [4].
It has been shown to inhibit photocarcinogenesis in animal studies.
(12) A meta-analysis from the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology reported that topical vitamin E is effective in reducing erythema, sunburn cells, and photocarcinogenesis, and that high doses of oral vitamin E reduce chronic UV-B-induced skin damage.
Extrinsic skin aging, also named as skin photoaging, is mainly caused by sun exposure, which could eventually result in photocarcinogenesis including malignant melanoma.