photoautotroph


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pho·to·au·to·troph

(fō'tō-aw'tō-trōf),
An organism that depends solely on light for its energy and principally on carbon dioxide for its carbon. Compare: photoheterotroph, photolithotroph, phototroph.
[photo- + G. autos, self, + trophē, nourishment]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

photoautotroph

(fō′tō-ô′tə-trŏf′, -trōf′)
pho′to·au′to·troph′ic adj.
pho′to·au′to·troph′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

photoautotroph

a type of AUTOTROPH that uses light as an energy source to synthesize organic compounds from inorganic materials. Green plants are photoautotrophs.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in practice, it represents chlorophyll a, which is a widespread antenna pigment relative to other chlorophylls and is quantitatively the most predominant chloropigment produced by virtually all of the oxygenic photoautotrophs. In the modern ocean, chlorophylls c are the second most important chlorophyll, and are produced by various algae including diatoms, coccolithophorids, and dinoflagellates.
competitive dominance of the prochlorophyte over other photoautotrophs
Hu Q, Guterman H, Richmond A (1996a) A flat inclined modular photobioreactor for outdoor mass cultivation of photoautotrophs. Biotechnol.
Since sunlight is by far the most abundant source of energy for the biosphere, throughout the history of life most primary production has been by photoautotrophs. Only some forms of bacteria, some protoctists (all are algae), and plants can perform photosynthesis.
Besides, due to it photoautotrophs characteristics cyanobacteria also known as blue-green algae and green pigments which result from photosynthesis.
The different rates can nearly overlap for disparate life-forms, much as noted two paragraphs above for simple animals (heterotrophic ectotherms) and efficient plants (advanced photoautotrophs).
Orth, "Dynamics of epiphytic photoautotrophs and heterotrophs in Zostera marina (Eelgrass) microcosms: responses to nutrient enrichment and grazing," Estuaries, vol.
piscesae metabolite flux, and support previous suppositions that hydrothermal vent vestimentiferan tubeworms are tremendous primary producers, comparable in body growth and mass specific rates to productive photoautotrophs (Lutz et al., 1994; Girguis and Childress.
All these factors seriously limit photosynthesis by photoautotrophs, mainly microscopic planktonic algae and cyanobacteria.
The results demonstrate the importance of evaluating physiological properties of pollution-intolerant algae in addition to community primary production when examining the effects of water quality on photoautotrophs.