photoaging


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photoaging

 [fo″to-āj´ing]
premature aging of the skin due to long-term exposure to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. See also actinic elastosis.

pho·to·ag·ing

(fō'tō-āj'ing),
Damage from years of sun exposure, particularly wrinkling of skin.
[[photo- + aging]]

photoaging

(fō′tō-ā′jĭng)
n.
1. The process by which skin is changed or damaged as a result of exposure to ultraviolet radiation in sunlight and other sources.
2. The long-term effects of this process on the skin, as wrinkles, discoloration, or susceptibility to cancer.

pho′to·aged′ (-ājd′) adj.

pho·to·ag·ing

(fō'tō-āj'ing)
Damage from years of sun exposure, particularly wrinkling of skin.
[photo- + aging]
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of how 'normal' your skin looks after sun exposure, even if not done deliberately, such as while gardening or playing sports, being under the sun on a regular basis not only makes you look older than you are (also called photoaging), but it can also ultimately increase your skin cancer risk.
In human skin, MMP-1 is the type most affected by sun UV induction and is responsible for the breakdown of collagen in the skin undergoing photoaging. (10) It was found that only one exposure to UV radiation can interfere with the connective tissue by causing synthesis disorders collagen is almost complete, 24 hours later followed by recovery 48-72 hours later.
Sunscreens have been proven to have protective effects against photoaging and reduce the incidence of skin cancers.5
"Photoaging is not nearly as prevalent in people with dark complexions," she says.
Skin photoaging and the role of antioxidants in its prevention.
Thus, ADSC and its secretory factors are effective in wrinkles resulting from photoaging. The antiwrinkle effect is mainly mediated by reducing UVB-induced apoptosis and stimulating collagen synthesis of human dermal fibroblasts [12-14].
Researchers are eager to continue investigating how they can use mushrooms in other ways to fight photoaging.
Topical Vitamin A (tretinoin) has been proven to, at least partly, "revers[e] the structural damages of excessive sunlight exposure and may be useful in decelerating the photoaging process." In other words, it can reverse signs of aging in the skin.
This study aimed to explore the relation between aberrant DNA hydroxymethylation with skin photoaging and to investigate the levels of TETs, 5mC, and 5hmC expression 24 h after 40 mJ/cm[sup]2 and 80 mJ/cm[sup]2 doses of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation to HaCaT cells.
Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun or artificial sources has a deleterious effect on skin functions and keratinocyte survival, a process known as photoaging (10,11).
By contrast, in extrinsic aging or photoaging, the long-term effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and other environmental agents such as gravity, pollution, diet, tobacco, illness, or stress, favor the development of the clinical signs of extrinsic aging like pigmentation changes, telangiectasias, increment of corneal size, deep wrinkles, actinic keratosis, and precancerous and cancerous skin lesions [2].
Hence, the mechanisms underlying skin photoaging and wrinkling are closely associated with the inflammaging, apoptosis, and ROS-induced damage that occurs as part of the normal homeostatic processes in the skin [7, 8-11].