phosphorescence


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phosphorescence

 [fos″fo-res´ens]
the emission of light without appreciable heat; it is characterized by the emission of absorbed light after a delay and at a considerably longer wavelength than that of the absorbed light. adj., adj phosphores´cent.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fos'fŏ-res'ĕnts),
The quality or property of emitting light without active combustion or the production of heat, generally as the result of prior exposure to radiation, which persists after the inciting cause is removed.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorescence

(fŏs′fə-rĕs′əns)
n.
1. Persistent emission of light following exposure to and removal of incident radiation.
2. Emission of light without appreciable heat, as from chemiluminescence of phosphorus or bioluminescence of living organisms.

phos′pho·res′cent adj.
phos′pho·res′cent·ly adv.

phosphorescence

[fos′fôres′əns]
Etymology: Gk, phos, light, pherein, to bear
1 a glow of yellow phosphorus caused by slow oxidation.
2 the emission of visible light without accompanying heat as observed in phosphorus that has been exposed to radiation, which continues beyond a few nanoseconds after radiation has ceased.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fosfŏr-esĕns)
The quality or property of emitting light with neither active combustion nor production of heat, generally as the result of prior exposure to radiation, which persists after the inciting cause is removed.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorescence

see BIOLUMINESCENCE.

phosphorescence 

Luminescence that persists for some time after the exciting stimulus has ceased.

phos·pho·res·cence

(fosfŏr-esĕns)
The quality or property of emitting light with neither active combustion nor production of heat, generally as the result of prior exposure to radiation, which persists after the inciting cause is removed.
[G. phōs, light, + phoros, bearing]

phosphorescence (fos″fores´əns),

adj the seeming ability to glow in the dark; occurs in substances that continue to emit light following exposure to and subsequent removal of a radiation source.

phosphorescence

the emission of light without appreciable heat; it is characterized by the emission of absorbed light after a delay and at a considerably longer wavelength than that of the absorbed light. Caused by a number of bacteria, especially in seawater. One of them, Pseudomonas phosphorescens, may infect coldrooms via infected fish but does not constitute decomposition so that phosphorescent meat is still edible.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the plate blackened when the mineral was in the dark, so this had nothing to do with phosphorescence.
1-2) As is known, strontium aluminates doped with divalent europium ions possess high quantum efficiency, long phosphorescence persistence and good stability, indicating their good practical prospects.
The photophysical properties of BPBnzx were also determined by means of singlet excited state energy, phosphorescence lifetime and triplet energy.
From under the billowing dead, from their wet hands and a saving grace, The children begin to move, an angle of phosphorescence Along the ridge line.
The modern clinical chemistry laboratory now uses a wide variety of photometric techniques, including fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, nephelometry, chemiluminescence, phosphorescence, and electrochemiluminescence.
For example, imagine you had a meter, like a light meter for photography, only this didn't measure luminescence or phosphorescence, this measured the phorescence of metaphors.
This very special species of phosphorescence plankton can be spotted on a dark night, glowing and lighting up the fish as they swim below.
London, Feb 15 (ANI): University of Michigan researchers have created a new class of material that shines with phosphorescence, which they say could lead to cheaper, more efficient and flexible display screens, among other applications.
One huge thing was for Phosphorescence to just feel like a family-run project.
He contributed research in the fields of phosphorescence, radar, isotope separation, and X-ray diffraction, but was most widely known for his work at King's College, London, on the structure of DNA.
A few months after Pater died, Henry James said of him: 'He shines in the uneasy gloom - vaguely - with a phosphorescence, not a flame' (letter to Edmund Gosse, 13 December 1894).