phosphine


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phos·phine

(fos'fēn, -fin),
A colorless poisonous war gas (PH3) with a characteristic garliclike odor; also the active agent in some rodenticides; formed in small quantities in the putrefaction of organic matter containing phosphorus.

phosphine

1. PH3, a toxic war gas called hydrogen phosphide.
2. a coal tar dye; called Philadelphia yellow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Children exposed to phosphine are at a greater risk of poisoning compared to adults due to a higher lung surface area to body weight ratio and faster respiratory rates.
It has been proven that the systemic toxicity caused by phosphine is mainly to the heart, lungs, liver, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and brain since P[H.
Airplane pilots as well as ship captains use it to make sure that the cockpit and ship's steering room are clear of phosphine gas.
Both the liver and kidney are rich in the cytochrome P450 which are necessary for this biotransformation, but phosphine the active metabolite of phosphide is made up of one molecule of phosphorus and three molecules of hydrogen.
Progeny removed from these stocks supposed to be of equal age, size were further held for a period of two weeks before exposure to phosphine gas and conduction of experiment.
Phosphine is a gas and is dangerous, if handled by untrained personnel.
In five-hour fumigations with 1,000 parts per million of phosphine at 41 degrees Fahrenheit, control of western flower thrips on lettuce increased from 80% to 98% when oxygen was increased from 21% to 40%.
In a series of experiments, Liu tested phosphine fumigation under high levels of oxygen against four insects and at different life stages: western flower thrips adults and larvae, leaf miner pupae, grape mealy bug eggs, and Indian meal moth eggs and pupae.
Veterinary staff members need to be aware of this occupational hazard and the phosphine product precautions posted on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.
The continuous and indiscriminate use of phosphine from the 80's has caused the rapid evolution of resistance in populations of insect pests of stored products (Bell, 2000; Chaudhry, 2000; Collins et al.