phosphate

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phosphate

 [fos´fāt]
any salt or ester of phosphoric acid. adj., adj phosphat´ic.

Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), take part in a series of reversible reactions involving phosphoric acid, lactic acid, glycogen, and other substances, which furnish the energy expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine, and certain other body compounds.

phos·phate (P),

(fos'fāt),
A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the name of the base.

phosphate

/phos·phate/ (fos´fāt) any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.phosphat´ic

phosphate (PO43-)

[fos′fāt]
1 an anion of phosphoric acid.
2 a salt of phosphoric acid. Phosphates are extremely important in living cells, particularly in the storage and use of energy and the transmission of genetic information within a cell and from one cell to another. See also adenosine diphosphate, adenosine triphosphate, phosphorus.

phos·phate

(fos'fāt)
1. A salt or ester (especially inorganic) of phosphoric acid.
2. The trivalent ion, PO43-.

phosphate

any salt or ester of any PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Phosphate

An organic compound necessary for mineralization of bone and other key cellular processes.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism

phosphate

any salt or ester of phosphoric acid.
1. Phosphates are widely distributed in the body, the largest amounts being in the bones and teeth. They are continually excreted in the urine and feces, and must be replaced in the diet. Inorganic phosphates function as buffer salts to maintain the acid-base balance in blood, saliva, urine and other body fluids. The principal phosphates in this buffer system are monosodium and disodium phosphate. Organic phosphates, in particular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are used to store the chemical bond energy released during the oxidation of compounds such as glycogen or fatty acids, which may later be expended in muscle contraction. This is thought to occur through the hydrolysis of the so-called high-energy phosphate bond present in ATP, phosphocreatine and certain other body compounds. See also hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphatemia.
2. used extensively in agricultural industry as fertilizers and organic compounds as cleaning agents.

phosphate binders
usually aluminum carbonate or hydroxide preparations, used to bind phosphates and limit their absorption from the intestine. Used in the treatment of the hyperphosphatemia of renal failure.
phosphate buffer
important phosphate-containing buffers.
phosphate buffered saline
a special phosphate buffered saline used in tissue cultures and for the storage and transport of bovine embryos. Abbreviated PBS.
phosphate calculi
see struvite urolith.
dietary phosphate
supplementation of the diet with phosphate in some form is a very common practice in farm animals. Materials used include rock phosphate (defluorination may be necessary), sodium dihydrogen phosphate produced by the agricultural chemical industry, calcium triphosphate and bone meal or flour.
inorganic phosphate
any salt of phosphoric acid.
phosphate retention
a phenomenon resulting from reduced glomerular filtration; contributes to a chronic hypocalcemic state.
phosphate ridge
see mineralization front.
phosphate rock
phosphate yielding endonucleases
a class of ribonuclease involved in the usually fairly rapid turnover of RNA in the cell that degrades RNA by cleavage of the phosphodiester bonds within the molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
He ZL, Baligar VC, Martens DC, Ritchey KD, Kemper WD (1996b) Factors affecting phosphate rock dissolution in acid soil amended with liming materials and cellulose.
Effect of phosphate, calcium and pH on the dissolution of a phosphate rock in soil.
Hence the intimate (and usually unrecognized) relationship between phosphate rock and sulphur, with sulphur demand--and therefore pricing--inextricably linked to the fortunes of phosphates and the usage of fertilizers.
Output of phosphate rock from the three producing areas has been hovering around the 20-21 Mt level for most of the 1980s.
The companies will also seal a long-term sourcing arrangement for phosphate rock to Yara's European NPK plants, the Norwegian group said.
In contrast, phosphate rock production has declined markedly in recent years and exports totalled less than 300,000 t in 1990, chiefly to East Europe and Asia.
Paradise aims to mine 1Mtpa of phosphate rock DSO from the Paradise North Project at an average grade of approximately 28% P2O5 and commence shipments by the second quarter of 2014.
In addition, Vale will buy Yara's 50% interest in the Anitapolis phosphate rock project.
The impact of all this movement in the DAP market on international phosphate rock prices has, so far, been minimal.
Exports of phosphate rock had improved in terms of both price and tonnage in 1989, greatly increasing the overall revenue obtained from this sector.
Legend anticipates that by using an Australian subsidiary it is better placed to lift the profile of the world quality phosphate assets, provide a stronger trading platform that will help maximise their value and enable further capital raising to support the development of phosphate rock production and subsequent value added products.
This scoping study has been developed to assess to potential for a direct phosphate rock (DSO) shipping operation.